File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Drought and Flood Characterization and Connection to Climate Variability in the Pearl River Basin in Southern China Using Long-Term GRACE and Reanalysis Data

TitleDrought and Flood Characterization and Connection to Climate Variability in the Pearl River Basin in Southern China Using Long-Term GRACE and Reanalysis Data
Authors
KeywordsDrought
Flood events
ENSO
Pacific decadal oscillation
Remote sensing
Issue Date2021
PublisherAmerican Meteorological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ams.allenpress.com
Citation
Journal of Climate, 2021, v. 34 n. 6, p. 2053-2078 How to Cite?
AbstractDrought and flood are investigated in the Pearl River basin (PRB) using long-term terrestrial water storage anomaly (TWSA) data from the mascon (mass concentration) solutions based on Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite measurements (2002–19) and reanalysis data (1980–2019). The GRACE mascon solutions capture two major drought periods (2003–06 and 2009–12) with similar onsets and endings over the last two decades, but show considerable differences in quantifying total drought severity. The reanalysis data significantly overestimate drought duration and severity during 1980–2000 owing to overestimated negative TWSA forced by underestimated precipitation. The GRACE mascon solutions identify four major flood events in August 2002, June 2008, and July in 2006 and 2019. The flood potential is influenced by the precipitation in both the current and antecedent months. The flood potential index of the most recent flood in 2008 showed a similar spatial pattern compared to precipitation at monthly and subbasin scales. The precipitation and TWSA in the PRB are mainly influenced by El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). TWSA exhibits a lag of 1–3 months responding to ENSO during 1980–2019. This study emphasizes the significance of removing water storage changes in new large reservoirs before long-term drought and flood characterization. The inclusion of reservoir water storage would expand (shrink) the drought duration and overestimate (underestimate) drought severity for the period before (after) reservoir impoundment and overestimate flood potential for the period after reservoir impoundment. This study highlights the intensifying drought conditions in the PRB over the last four decades under the circumstances of more frequent human activities (reservoir construction and regulation) and the complex changing climate system.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/309016
ISSN
2021 Impact Factor: 5.380
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.315
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHUANG, Z-
dc.contributor.authorJiao, JJ-
dc.contributor.authorLuo, X-
dc.contributor.authorPan, Y-
dc.contributor.authorJin, T-
dc.date.accessioned2021-12-14T01:39:28Z-
dc.date.available2021-12-14T01:39:28Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Climate, 2021, v. 34 n. 6, p. 2053-2078-
dc.identifier.issn0894-8755-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/309016-
dc.description.abstractDrought and flood are investigated in the Pearl River basin (PRB) using long-term terrestrial water storage anomaly (TWSA) data from the mascon (mass concentration) solutions based on Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite measurements (2002–19) and reanalysis data (1980–2019). The GRACE mascon solutions capture two major drought periods (2003–06 and 2009–12) with similar onsets and endings over the last two decades, but show considerable differences in quantifying total drought severity. The reanalysis data significantly overestimate drought duration and severity during 1980–2000 owing to overestimated negative TWSA forced by underestimated precipitation. The GRACE mascon solutions identify four major flood events in August 2002, June 2008, and July in 2006 and 2019. The flood potential is influenced by the precipitation in both the current and antecedent months. The flood potential index of the most recent flood in 2008 showed a similar spatial pattern compared to precipitation at monthly and subbasin scales. The precipitation and TWSA in the PRB are mainly influenced by El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO). TWSA exhibits a lag of 1–3 months responding to ENSO during 1980–2019. This study emphasizes the significance of removing water storage changes in new large reservoirs before long-term drought and flood characterization. The inclusion of reservoir water storage would expand (shrink) the drought duration and overestimate (underestimate) drought severity for the period before (after) reservoir impoundment and overestimate flood potential for the period after reservoir impoundment. This study highlights the intensifying drought conditions in the PRB over the last four decades under the circumstances of more frequent human activities (reservoir construction and regulation) and the complex changing climate system.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Meteorological Society. The Journal's web site is located at http://ams.allenpress.com-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Climate-
dc.rightsJournal of Climate. Copyright © American Meteorological Society.-
dc.rights© Copyright [date of publication] American Meteorological Society (AMS).-
dc.subjectDrought-
dc.subjectFlood events-
dc.subjectENSO-
dc.subjectPacific decadal oscillation-
dc.subjectRemote sensing-
dc.titleDrought and Flood Characterization and Connection to Climate Variability in the Pearl River Basin in Southern China Using Long-Term GRACE and Reanalysis Data-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailJiao, JJ: jjiao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLuo, X: xinluo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityJiao, JJ=rp00712-
dc.identifier.authorityLuo, X=rp02606-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1175/JCLI-D-20-0332.1-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85102896298-
dc.identifier.hkuros330846-
dc.identifier.volume34-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage2053-
dc.identifier.epage2078-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000646372800005-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats