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Article: Low dose inocula of SARS-CoV-2 Alpha variant transmits more efficiently than earlier variants in hamsters

TitleLow dose inocula of SARS-CoV-2 Alpha variant transmits more efficiently than earlier variants in hamsters
Authors
Issue Date2021
PublisherNature Research: Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/commsbio
Citation
Communications Biology, 2021, v. 4, p. article no. 1102 How to Cite?
AbstractEmerging variants of SARS-CoV-2 have been shown to rapidly replace original circulating strains in humans soon after they emerged. There is a lack of experimental evidence to explain how these natural occurring variants spread more efficiently than existing strains of SARS-CoV-2 in transmission. We found that the Alpha variant (B.1.1.7) increased competitive fitness over earlier parental D614G lineages in in-vitro and in-vivo systems. Using hamster transmission model, we further demonstrated that the Alpha variant is able to replicate and shed more efficiently in the nasal cavity of hamsters than other variants with low dose and short duration of exposure. The capability to initiate effective infection with low inocula may be one of the key factors leading to the rapid transmission of emerging variants of SARS-CoV-2.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304999
ISSN
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.812
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, BWY-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, H-
dc.contributor.authorDeng, S-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, J-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, AJ-
dc.contributor.authorLau, SY-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, S-
dc.contributor.authorTam, CY-
dc.contributor.authorCremin, CJ-
dc.contributor.authorNg, TTL-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, JSL-
dc.contributor.authorLee, LK-
dc.contributor.authorWang, P-
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, JFW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY-
dc.contributor.authorSiu, GKH-
dc.contributor.authorChen, H-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T02:38:17Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-05T02:38:17Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationCommunications Biology, 2021, v. 4, p. article no. 1102-
dc.identifier.issn2399-3642-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304999-
dc.description.abstractEmerging variants of SARS-CoV-2 have been shown to rapidly replace original circulating strains in humans soon after they emerged. There is a lack of experimental evidence to explain how these natural occurring variants spread more efficiently than existing strains of SARS-CoV-2 in transmission. We found that the Alpha variant (B.1.1.7) increased competitive fitness over earlier parental D614G lineages in in-vitro and in-vivo systems. Using hamster transmission model, we further demonstrated that the Alpha variant is able to replicate and shed more efficiently in the nasal cavity of hamsters than other variants with low dose and short duration of exposure. The capability to initiate effective infection with low inocula may be one of the key factors leading to the rapid transmission of emerging variants of SARS-CoV-2.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research: Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/commsbio-
dc.relation.ispartofCommunications Biology-
dc.rightsCommunications Biology. Copyright © Nature Research: Fully open access journals.-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleLow dose inocula of SARS-CoV-2 Alpha variant transmits more efficiently than earlier variants in hamsters-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMok, BWY: bobomok@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, J: liujy621@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhang, AJ: zhangajx@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, S: siwenliu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTam, CY: rach2011@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWang, P: puiwang@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTo, KKW: kelvinto@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, JFW: jfwchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KH: chankh2@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: hlchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityZhang, AJ=rp00413-
dc.identifier.authorityTo, KKW=rp01384-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, JFW=rp01736-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KH=rp01921-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp00383-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s42003-021-02640-x-
dc.identifier.pmid34545191-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8452646-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85115380504-
dc.identifier.hkuros326059-
dc.identifier.volume4-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 1102-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 1102-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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