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Article: Territory-wide study on hospital admissions for asthma exacerbations in the COVID-19 pandemic

TitleTerritory-wide study on hospital admissions for asthma exacerbations in the COVID-19 pandemic
Authors
Keywordsasthma
COVID-19
hospitalization
masks
Issue Date2021
PublisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.atsjournals.org/journal/annalsats/
Citation
Annals of the American Thoracic Society, 2021, v. 18 n. 10, p. 1624-1633 How to Cite?
AbstractRationale: Patients with asthma were advised to avoid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and comply with medication during the COVID-19 pandemic. Respiratory tract infection is a common cause of asthma exacerbations. There has not been evidence suggesting the link between COVID-19 and asthma exacerbation, especially in places with dramatic responses in infection control with universal masking and aggressive social distancing. Objectives: To assess the number for admissions of asthma exacerbations in January to April 2020 in Hong Kong with reference to admission in the past 5 years. Methods: Admission records of asthma exacerbations were retrieved from the Clinical Data Analysis and Reporting System. Patients aged 18 years or older with a known history of asthma admitted for asthma exacerbation were included. Log-linear was used to model count, with year and masking used as covariate and further analysis on ambient temperature and length of hospital stays. Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the mortality rate and mechanical ventilation between the periods. Admissions for myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and gastric ulcer were included as controls. Results: The number of admissions for asthma exacerbations significantly decreased by 53.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50.4–55.8%) in 2020 compared with monthly average admission in 2015–2019, with a higher magnitude of decrease compared with control diagnoses. Admissions for asthma exacerbations decreased by 2.0% (95% CI, 1.8–2.2%) with every 1°C (1.8°F) increase in temperature and by 0.8% with every 1% increase in masking (95% CI, 0.8–0.9%). Conclusions: Hospitalization number for asthma exacerbations significantly decreased in early 2020, with similar length of stay. This was observed with concomitant practice of universal masking and social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong. We proposed that universal masking and social distancing reduced respiratory viral infection, leading to fewer hospital admissions for asthma exacerbations.
DescriptionHybrid open access
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304995
ISSN

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, FKP-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, WC-
dc.contributor.authorMa, TF-
dc.contributor.authorHui, CH-
dc.contributor.authorTam, CCT-
dc.contributor.authorWang, KLJ-
dc.contributor.authorHo, JCM-
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLD-
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSM-
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T02:38:14Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-05T02:38:14Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationAnnals of the American Thoracic Society, 2021, v. 18 n. 10, p. 1624-1633-
dc.identifier.issn2329-6933-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304995-
dc.descriptionHybrid open access-
dc.description.abstractRationale: Patients with asthma were advised to avoid coronavirus disease (COVID-19) and comply with medication during the COVID-19 pandemic. Respiratory tract infection is a common cause of asthma exacerbations. There has not been evidence suggesting the link between COVID-19 and asthma exacerbation, especially in places with dramatic responses in infection control with universal masking and aggressive social distancing. Objectives: To assess the number for admissions of asthma exacerbations in January to April 2020 in Hong Kong with reference to admission in the past 5 years. Methods: Admission records of asthma exacerbations were retrieved from the Clinical Data Analysis and Reporting System. Patients aged 18 years or older with a known history of asthma admitted for asthma exacerbation were included. Log-linear was used to model count, with year and masking used as covariate and further analysis on ambient temperature and length of hospital stays. Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the mortality rate and mechanical ventilation between the periods. Admissions for myocardial infarction, ischemic stroke, and gastric ulcer were included as controls. Results: The number of admissions for asthma exacerbations significantly decreased by 53.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 50.4–55.8%) in 2020 compared with monthly average admission in 2015–2019, with a higher magnitude of decrease compared with control diagnoses. Admissions for asthma exacerbations decreased by 2.0% (95% CI, 1.8–2.2%) with every 1°C (1.8°F) increase in temperature and by 0.8% with every 1% increase in masking (95% CI, 0.8–0.9%). Conclusions: Hospitalization number for asthma exacerbations significantly decreased in early 2020, with similar length of stay. This was observed with concomitant practice of universal masking and social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic in Hong Kong. We proposed that universal masking and social distancing reduced respiratory viral infection, leading to fewer hospital admissions for asthma exacerbations.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Thoracic Society. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.atsjournals.org/journal/annalsats/-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnals of the American Thoracic Society-
dc.rightsAccepted version: Originally Published in: [Authors]. [Article Title]. [Journal Name] [Year];[Volume]:[Pages]. DOI: [Number] Copyright © 2017 by the American Thoracic Society The final publication is available at [Link]. -
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectasthma-
dc.subjectCOVID-19-
dc.subjecthospitalization-
dc.subjectmasks-
dc.titleTerritory-wide study on hospital admissions for asthma exacerbations in the COVID-19 pandemic-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHo, JCM: jhocm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLD: dcllam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM: msmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL: plho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, JCM=rp00258-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLD=rp01345-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1513/AnnalsATS.202010-1247OC-
dc.identifier.pmid33636091-
dc.identifier.hkuros326336-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage1624-
dc.identifier.epage1633-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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