File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)

Article: Sarcopenia and mortality in cancer: A meta-analysis

TitleSarcopenia and mortality in cancer: A meta-analysis
Authors
KeywordsSarcopenia
Lean mass
Cancer
Issue Date2021
PublisherElsevier B.V and the Korean Society of Osteoporosis. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.journals.elsevier.com/osteoporosis-and-sarcopenia
Citation
Osteoporosis and Sarcopenia, 2021, v. 7 n. suppl. 1, p. S28-S33 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: The aim of this meta-analysis is to comprehensively evaluate the effects of lean mass on all-cause mortality across different cancer types. Methods: This is a meta-analysis. Cohort studies on lean mass and mortality published before December 20, 2017 were obtained by systematic search on PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase. Inclusion criteria were cohort studies reporting lean mass measurements by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, bioimpedance analysis or computed tomography, and with all-cause mortality as the study outcome. Exclusion criteria were studies using muscle mass surrogates, anthropometric measurement of muscle, rate of change in muscle mass, and sarcopenia defined by composite criteria. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of low/reduced lean mass on cancer mortality were pooled with a random-effects model. Subgroup analysis stratifying studies according to cancer type and measurement index was performed. Results: Altogether 100 studies evaluated the association between lean mass and cancer mortality. The overall pooled HR on cancer mortality was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.24 to 1.59) for every standard deviation decrease in lean mass and 1.69 (95% CI, 1.56 to 1.83) for patients with sarcopenia (binary cutoffs). Overall mortality was also significantly associated with sarcopenia in across various cancer types, except for hematopoietic, breast, ovarian and endometrial, and prostate cancer. Conclusions: The robust association of decreased lean mass with increased mortality further justified the importance of developing clinical guidelines for managing sarcopenia in cancer patients. Public health initiatives aiming at promoting awareness of muscle health in susceptible individuals are urgently needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304661
ISSN
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAU, PCM-
dc.contributor.authorLi, HL-
dc.contributor.authorLEE, GKY-
dc.contributor.authorLi, GHY-
dc.contributor.authorChan, M-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, BMY-
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICK-
dc.contributor.authorLee, VHF-
dc.contributor.authorMok, J-
dc.contributor.authorYip, BHK-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, KKY-
dc.contributor.authorWu, CH-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CL-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T02:33:20Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-05T02:33:20Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationOsteoporosis and Sarcopenia, 2021, v. 7 n. suppl. 1, p. S28-S33-
dc.identifier.issn2405-5255-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304661-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: The aim of this meta-analysis is to comprehensively evaluate the effects of lean mass on all-cause mortality across different cancer types. Methods: This is a meta-analysis. Cohort studies on lean mass and mortality published before December 20, 2017 were obtained by systematic search on PubMed, Cochrane Library, and Embase. Inclusion criteria were cohort studies reporting lean mass measurements by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, bioimpedance analysis or computed tomography, and with all-cause mortality as the study outcome. Exclusion criteria were studies using muscle mass surrogates, anthropometric measurement of muscle, rate of change in muscle mass, and sarcopenia defined by composite criteria. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) of low/reduced lean mass on cancer mortality were pooled with a random-effects model. Subgroup analysis stratifying studies according to cancer type and measurement index was performed. Results: Altogether 100 studies evaluated the association between lean mass and cancer mortality. The overall pooled HR on cancer mortality was 1.41 (95% CI, 1.24 to 1.59) for every standard deviation decrease in lean mass and 1.69 (95% CI, 1.56 to 1.83) for patients with sarcopenia (binary cutoffs). Overall mortality was also significantly associated with sarcopenia in across various cancer types, except for hematopoietic, breast, ovarian and endometrial, and prostate cancer. Conclusions: The robust association of decreased lean mass with increased mortality further justified the importance of developing clinical guidelines for managing sarcopenia in cancer patients. Public health initiatives aiming at promoting awareness of muscle health in susceptible individuals are urgently needed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier B.V and the Korean Society of Osteoporosis. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.journals.elsevier.com/osteoporosis-and-sarcopenia-
dc.relation.ispartofOsteoporosis and Sarcopenia-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectSarcopenia-
dc.subjectLean mass-
dc.subjectCancer-
dc.titleSarcopenia and mortality in cancer: A meta-analysis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, BMY: mycheung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, VHF: vhflee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, CL: lung1212@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, BMY=rp01321-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, VHF=rp00264-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, CL=rp01749-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.afos.2021.03.002-
dc.identifier.pmid33997306-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8088991-
dc.identifier.hkuros325803-
dc.identifier.volume7-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spageS28-
dc.identifier.epageS33-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats