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Article: Prevalence and determinants of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine hesitancy in Hong Kong: A population-based survey

TitlePrevalence and determinants of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine hesitancy in Hong Kong: A population-based survey
Authors
KeywordsCoronavirus
COVID-19
Vaccine hesitancy
Vaccine acceptance
Chinese
Issue Date2021
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/vaccine
Citation
Vaccine, 2021, v. 39 n. 27, p. 3602-3607 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Although vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the most desired solution to end the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, there are growing concerns that vaccine hesitancy would undermine its potential. We examined the intention to receive vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 and the associated factors in a representative sample of Chinese adults in Hong Kong. Methods: We did a dual-frame (landline and mobile) cross-sectional survey of a random sample of 1501 Hong Kong residents aged 18 years or older (53.6% females) in April 2020. We collected data on the intention to receive SARS-CoV-2 vaccine when it becomes available (yes/ no/ undecided), knowledge and perceptions of COVID-19, smoking, alcohol drinking, and sociodemographic factors. Prevalence estimates were weighted by the sex, age, and education of the general population of Hong Kong. Results: Overall, 45.3% (95% CI: 42.3–48.4%) of the participants had intentions to vaccinate against SARS-CoV-2 when it becomes available, 29.2% (26.5–32.1%) were undecided, and 25.5% (22.9–28.2%) had no intention. The most common reason for vaccine hesitancy (undecided or no intention) was safety concerns (56.5%). Multivariable partial proportional odds model showed higher vaccine hesitancy in males, younger adults, those with no chronic disease, current smokers, and non-alcohol drinkers. After adjusting for sociodemographic and other factors, inadequate knowledge of SARS-CoV-2 transmission (adjusted ORs ranged from 1.27 to 2.63; P < 0.05) and lower perceived danger of COVID-19 (adjusted ORs ranged from 1.62 to 2.47; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with vaccine hesitancy. Conclusions: In a representative sample of Chinese adults in Hong Kong, only 45.3% of the participants intended to vaccinate against SARS-CoV-2 when available. Vaccine hesitancy was associated with inadequate knowledge about SARS-CoV-2 transmission and lower perceived danger of COVID-19, which needed to be addressed to improve vaccination uptake.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/301604
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.641
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.585
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuk, TT-
dc.contributor.authorZhao, S-
dc.contributor.authorWu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorWong, JYH-
dc.contributor.authorWang, MP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-09T03:41:29Z-
dc.date.available2021-08-09T03:41:29Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationVaccine, 2021, v. 39 n. 27, p. 3602-3607-
dc.identifier.issn0264-410X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/301604-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Although vaccination against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is the most desired solution to end the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, there are growing concerns that vaccine hesitancy would undermine its potential. We examined the intention to receive vaccination against SARS-CoV-2 and the associated factors in a representative sample of Chinese adults in Hong Kong. Methods: We did a dual-frame (landline and mobile) cross-sectional survey of a random sample of 1501 Hong Kong residents aged 18 years or older (53.6% females) in April 2020. We collected data on the intention to receive SARS-CoV-2 vaccine when it becomes available (yes/ no/ undecided), knowledge and perceptions of COVID-19, smoking, alcohol drinking, and sociodemographic factors. Prevalence estimates were weighted by the sex, age, and education of the general population of Hong Kong. Results: Overall, 45.3% (95% CI: 42.3–48.4%) of the participants had intentions to vaccinate against SARS-CoV-2 when it becomes available, 29.2% (26.5–32.1%) were undecided, and 25.5% (22.9–28.2%) had no intention. The most common reason for vaccine hesitancy (undecided or no intention) was safety concerns (56.5%). Multivariable partial proportional odds model showed higher vaccine hesitancy in males, younger adults, those with no chronic disease, current smokers, and non-alcohol drinkers. After adjusting for sociodemographic and other factors, inadequate knowledge of SARS-CoV-2 transmission (adjusted ORs ranged from 1.27 to 2.63; P < 0.05) and lower perceived danger of COVID-19 (adjusted ORs ranged from 1.62 to 2.47; P < 0.001) were significantly associated with vaccine hesitancy. Conclusions: In a representative sample of Chinese adults in Hong Kong, only 45.3% of the participants intended to vaccinate against SARS-CoV-2 when available. Vaccine hesitancy was associated with inadequate knowledge about SARS-CoV-2 transmission and lower perceived danger of COVID-19, which needed to be addressed to improve vaccination uptake.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/vaccine-
dc.relation.ispartofVaccine-
dc.subjectCoronavirus-
dc.subjectCOVID-19-
dc.subjectVaccine hesitancy-
dc.subjectVaccine acceptance-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.titlePrevalence and determinants of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine hesitancy in Hong Kong: A population-based survey-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLuk, TT: luktt@connect.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWu, Y: yongdang@connect.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, JYH: janetyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWang, MP: mpwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLuk, TT=rp02827-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, JYH=rp01561-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, MP=rp01863-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.vaccine.2021.05.036-
dc.identifier.pmid34034950-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8130539-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85106600283-
dc.identifier.hkuros323864-
dc.identifier.volume39-
dc.identifier.issue27-
dc.identifier.spage3602-
dc.identifier.epage3607-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000659020000008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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