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Conference Paper: Decreasing of motivation to quit in Hong Kong community smokers: A secondary analysis of Quit-to-Win smoking cessation trails (2009-2018)

TitleDecreasing of motivation to quit in Hong Kong community smokers: A secondary analysis of Quit-to-Win smoking cessation trails (2009-2018)
Authors
Issue Date2020
PublisherSociety for the Study of Addiction.
Citation
Society for the Study of Addiction Annual Conference 2020, Virtual Conference. 5-6 November 2020 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: To investigate the trends of intention, attempts and self-efficacy on quitting (i.e., motivation to quit) of participants in the Quit-to-Win (QTW) Contests (an annual smoke-free community campaign) during 2009-2018. Methods QTW participants (N=9837) were actively recruited daily smokers aged 18 or above from community settings (18.5% female, 44.1% aged 18-39 years). Baseline questionnaires collected information on intention to quit, quit attempts (yes/no) and perceived importance and confidence on quitting, nicotine dependence (Heaviness of Smoking Index, range 0-6) and sociodemographic. All data were weighted to the sex-age distribution of participants in 2009. We used multivariable ordinal logistic and linear regressions to analyse motivation to quit by study years, adjusted for sociodemographic and nicotine dependence. Results: Prevalence of high nicotine dependence (score >4) was decreasing (odds ratio per year 0.97, 95%CI 0.96-0.99). Proportion of participants intended to quit in 7 days decreased from 66.4% in 2009 to 20.2% in 2018 (P<0.001). The increase of no intention to quit was associated with study year (adjusted ß 0.15, 95%CI 0.14, 0.17). Prevalence of past year and lifetime quit attempt decreased from 25.5% and 71.0% (2009) to 19.6% and 61.8% (2018) (both Ps<0.001). Perceived importance and confidence on quitting decreased from 7.9 ± 2.3 (standard deviation) and 6.2 ± 2.6 to 6.6 ± 2.5 and 5.3 ± 2.4, respectively (both Ps<0.001). Conclusions: Participants have become less motivated to quit. Smoking cessation interventions need to be modified to support quitting as the proportion of hard-core smokers appears increasing, even when nicotine dependence appears decreasing.
DescriptionPoster Presentation - Conference Posters 2020: Student-led research
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289570

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhao, S-
dc.contributor.authorWu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorGuo, N-
dc.contributor.authorLi, WHC-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, YTD-
dc.contributor.authorKwong, ACS-
dc.contributor.authorLai, VWY-
dc.contributor.authorWang, MP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:14:30Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:14:30Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationSociety for the Study of Addiction Annual Conference 2020, Virtual Conference. 5-6 November 2020-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289570-
dc.descriptionPoster Presentation - Conference Posters 2020: Student-led research-
dc.description.abstractAim: To investigate the trends of intention, attempts and self-efficacy on quitting (i.e., motivation to quit) of participants in the Quit-to-Win (QTW) Contests (an annual smoke-free community campaign) during 2009-2018. Methods QTW participants (N=9837) were actively recruited daily smokers aged 18 or above from community settings (18.5% female, 44.1% aged 18-39 years). Baseline questionnaires collected information on intention to quit, quit attempts (yes/no) and perceived importance and confidence on quitting, nicotine dependence (Heaviness of Smoking Index, range 0-6) and sociodemographic. All data were weighted to the sex-age distribution of participants in 2009. We used multivariable ordinal logistic and linear regressions to analyse motivation to quit by study years, adjusted for sociodemographic and nicotine dependence. Results: Prevalence of high nicotine dependence (score >4) was decreasing (odds ratio per year 0.97, 95%CI 0.96-0.99). Proportion of participants intended to quit in 7 days decreased from 66.4% in 2009 to 20.2% in 2018 (P<0.001). The increase of no intention to quit was associated with study year (adjusted ß 0.15, 95%CI 0.14, 0.17). Prevalence of past year and lifetime quit attempt decreased from 25.5% and 71.0% (2009) to 19.6% and 61.8% (2018) (both Ps<0.001). Perceived importance and confidence on quitting decreased from 7.9 ± 2.3 (standard deviation) and 6.2 ± 2.6 to 6.6 ± 2.5 and 5.3 ± 2.4, respectively (both Ps<0.001). Conclusions: Participants have become less motivated to quit. Smoking cessation interventions need to be modified to support quitting as the proportion of hard-core smokers appears increasing, even when nicotine dependence appears decreasing.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSociety for the Study of Addiction. -
dc.relation.ispartofSociety for the Study of Addiction Annual Conference 2020-
dc.titleDecreasing of motivation to quit in Hong Kong community smokers: A secondary analysis of Quit-to-Win smoking cessation trails (2009-2018)-
dc.typeConference_Paper-
dc.identifier.emailWu, Y: ydswu@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, WHC: william3@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, YTD: takderek@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWang, MP: mpwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, WHC=rp00528-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, YTD=rp02262-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, MP=rp01863-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.identifier.hkuros316701-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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