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Article: Enjoy your evening, be proactive tomorrow: How off-job experiences shape daily proactivity

TitleEnjoy your evening, be proactive tomorrow: How off-job experiences shape daily proactivity
Authors
KeywordsDaily proactive behavior
Work recovery
Positive affect
Role breadth self-efficacy
Desire for control
Issue Date2019
PublisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/apl.html
Citation
Journal of Applied Psychology, 2019, v. 104 n. 8, p. 1003-1019 How to Cite?
AbstractDrawing on conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989) and the model of proactive motivation (Parker, Bindl, & Strauss, 2010), this research employs experience sampling methods to examine how employees’ off-job experiences during the evening relate to their proactive behavior at work the next day. A multilevel path analysis of data from 183 employees across 10 workdays indicated that various types of off-job experiences in the evening had differential effects on daily proactive behavior during the subsequent workday, and the psychological mechanisms underlying these varied relationships were distinct. Specifically, off-job mastery in the evening related positively to next-morning high-activated positive affect and role breadth self-efficacy, off-job agency in the evening related positively to next-morning role breadth self-efficacy and desire for control, and off-job hassles in the evening related negatively to next-morning high-activated positive affect; next-morning high-activated positive affect, role breadth self-efficacy, and desire for control, in turn, predicted next-day proactive behavior. Off-job relaxation in the evening related positively to next-morning low-activated positive affect, and off-job detachment in the evening had a decreasingly positive curvilinear relationship with next-morning low-activated positive affect. However, as expected, these two types of off-job experiences and low-activated positive affect did not relate to next-day proactive behavior.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/288531
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 7.429
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.522
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorOuyang, K-
dc.contributor.authorCheng, BH-
dc.contributor.authorLam, W-
dc.contributor.authorParker, SK-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-07T02:12:33Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-07T02:12:33Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Applied Psychology, 2019, v. 104 n. 8, p. 1003-1019-
dc.identifier.issn0021-9010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/288531-
dc.description.abstractDrawing on conservation of resources theory (Hobfoll, 1989) and the model of proactive motivation (Parker, Bindl, & Strauss, 2010), this research employs experience sampling methods to examine how employees’ off-job experiences during the evening relate to their proactive behavior at work the next day. A multilevel path analysis of data from 183 employees across 10 workdays indicated that various types of off-job experiences in the evening had differential effects on daily proactive behavior during the subsequent workday, and the psychological mechanisms underlying these varied relationships were distinct. Specifically, off-job mastery in the evening related positively to next-morning high-activated positive affect and role breadth self-efficacy, off-job agency in the evening related positively to next-morning role breadth self-efficacy and desire for control, and off-job hassles in the evening related negatively to next-morning high-activated positive affect; next-morning high-activated positive affect, role breadth self-efficacy, and desire for control, in turn, predicted next-day proactive behavior. Off-job relaxation in the evening related positively to next-morning low-activated positive affect, and off-job detachment in the evening had a decreasingly positive curvilinear relationship with next-morning low-activated positive affect. However, as expected, these two types of off-job experiences and low-activated positive affect did not relate to next-day proactive behavior.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.apa.org/journals/apl.html-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Applied Psychology-
dc.subjectDaily proactive behavior-
dc.subjectWork recovery-
dc.subjectPositive affect-
dc.subjectRole breadth self-efficacy-
dc.subjectDesire for control-
dc.titleEnjoy your evening, be proactive tomorrow: How off-job experiences shape daily proactivity-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheng, BH: drbonnie@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheng, BH=rp02742-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/apl0000391-
dc.identifier.pmid30730165-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85061107935-
dc.identifier.hkuros314815-
dc.identifier.volume104-
dc.identifier.issue8-
dc.identifier.spage1003-
dc.identifier.epage1019-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000478024800002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl0021-9010-

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