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Article: Learning environments for interprofessional education: A micro-ethnography of sociomaterial assemblages in team-based learning

TitleLearning environments for interprofessional education: A micro-ethnography of sociomaterial assemblages in team-based learning
Authors
KeywordsBlended learning
Ethnography
Group dynamics
Interprofessional education
Sociomaterialty
Issue Date2020
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nedt
Citation
Nurse Education Today, 2020, v. 94, article no. 104569 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground Teamwork and collaboration are central to interprofessional education but fostering these attributes in large undergraduate cohorts is challenging. Objectives This study aimed to examine the complexities of IPE group learning processes by examining how the material and intersubjective intertwine when newly formed interprofessional groups (Chinese medicine, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work) synchronously engaged with face-to-face and online learning in a blended, team-based learning environment. Methods It was a micro-ethnography study using a sociomaterial theoretical lens. We selected two undergraduate interprofessional healthcare student groups within a large scale programme for contrastive video analysis of synchronous spatial and physical configurations, associated talk, and online activity. Results Video analysis of evolving physical configurations indicated that Group B was spatially more evenly grouped, and physically orientated to an identifiable leader, despite their blinded peer evaluations indicating distributed leadership. Group A faced a critical event at a public forum leading to spatial disruption breaking into subgroups and isolates; however, this group identified one member as a defined leader in the peer evaluations. Conclusions Based on online scores, we found that peer identification of leaders may influence learning processes but not learning outcomes in the first IPE team meeting. The design of the physical and virtual learning environments contributed to the developing, sociomaterial processes of group cohesion in interprofessional team-based learning.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287278
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.442
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.958
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBridges, SM-
dc.contributor.authorChan, LK-
dc.contributor.authorChen, JY-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, JPY-
dc.contributor.authorGanotice, FA-
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-22T02:58:33Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-22T02:58:33Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationNurse Education Today, 2020, v. 94, article no. 104569-
dc.identifier.issn0260-6917-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287278-
dc.description.abstractBackground Teamwork and collaboration are central to interprofessional education but fostering these attributes in large undergraduate cohorts is challenging. Objectives This study aimed to examine the complexities of IPE group learning processes by examining how the material and intersubjective intertwine when newly formed interprofessional groups (Chinese medicine, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and social work) synchronously engaged with face-to-face and online learning in a blended, team-based learning environment. Methods It was a micro-ethnography study using a sociomaterial theoretical lens. We selected two undergraduate interprofessional healthcare student groups within a large scale programme for contrastive video analysis of synchronous spatial and physical configurations, associated talk, and online activity. Results Video analysis of evolving physical configurations indicated that Group B was spatially more evenly grouped, and physically orientated to an identifiable leader, despite their blinded peer evaluations indicating distributed leadership. Group A faced a critical event at a public forum leading to spatial disruption breaking into subgroups and isolates; however, this group identified one member as a defined leader in the peer evaluations. Conclusions Based on online scores, we found that peer identification of leaders may influence learning processes but not learning outcomes in the first IPE team meeting. The design of the physical and virtual learning environments contributed to the developing, sociomaterial processes of group cohesion in interprofessional team-based learning.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/nedt-
dc.relation.ispartofNurse Education Today-
dc.subjectBlended learning-
dc.subjectEthnography-
dc.subjectGroup dynamics-
dc.subjectInterprofessional education-
dc.subjectSociomaterialty-
dc.titleLearning environments for interprofessional education: A micro-ethnography of sociomaterial assemblages in team-based learning-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailBridges, SM: sbridges@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, JY: juliechen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, JPY: joycetpy@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailGanotice, FA: ganotc75@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBridges, SM=rp00048-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, JY=rp00526-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.nedt.2020.104569-
dc.identifier.pmid32942246-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85090865530-
dc.identifier.hkuros314526-
dc.identifier.volume94-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 104569-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 104569-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000576788500002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0260-6917-

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