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Article: Significant reduction in hospital admissions for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Hong Kong during coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic

TitleSignificant reduction in hospital admissions for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Hong Kong during coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic
Authors
KeywordsChronic obstructive pulmonary disease
Coronavirus disease 2019
Hospitalization
Issue Date2020
PublisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rmed
Citation
Respiratory Medicine, 2020, v. 171, p. article no. 106085 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Chronic respiratory diseases are risk factors for severe disease in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Respiratory tract infection is one of the commonest causes of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). There has not been evidence suggesting the link between COVID-19 and AECOPD, especially in places with dramatic responses in infection control with universal masking and aggressive social distancing. Methods: This is a retrospective study to assess the number of admissions of AECOPD in the first three months of 2020 in Queen Mary Hospital with reference to the admissions in past five years. Log-linear model was used for statistical inference of covariates, including percentage of masking, air quality health index and air temperature. Results: The number of admissions for AECOPD significantly decreased by 44.0% (95% CI 36.4%–52.8%, p < 0.001) in the first three months of 2020 compared with the monthly average admission in 2015–2019. Compare to same period of previous years, AECOPD decreased by 1.0% with each percent of increased masking (p < 0.001) and decreased by 3.0% with increase in 1 °C in temperature (p = 0.045). The numbers of admissions for control diagnoses (heart failure, intestinal obstruction and iron deficiency anaemia) in the same period in 2020 were not reduced. Conclusions: The number of admissions for AECOPD decreased in first three months of 2020, compared with previous years. This was observed with increased masking percentage and social distancing in Hong Kong. We postulated universal masking and social distancing during COVID-19 pandemics both contributed in preventing respiratory tract infections hence AECOPD.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287154
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.415
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.316
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, KPF-
dc.contributor.authorMa, TF-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, WC-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, JKC-
dc.contributor.authorChiang, KY-
dc.contributor.authorHo, JCM-
dc.contributor.authorLam, DCL-
dc.contributor.authorTam, TCC-
dc.contributor.authorIp, MSM-
dc.contributor.authorHo, PL-
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-22T02:56:36Z-
dc.date.available2020-09-22T02:56:36Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationRespiratory Medicine, 2020, v. 171, p. article no. 106085-
dc.identifier.issn0954-6111-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287154-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Chronic respiratory diseases are risk factors for severe disease in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Respiratory tract infection is one of the commonest causes of acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD). There has not been evidence suggesting the link between COVID-19 and AECOPD, especially in places with dramatic responses in infection control with universal masking and aggressive social distancing. Methods: This is a retrospective study to assess the number of admissions of AECOPD in the first three months of 2020 in Queen Mary Hospital with reference to the admissions in past five years. Log-linear model was used for statistical inference of covariates, including percentage of masking, air quality health index and air temperature. Results: The number of admissions for AECOPD significantly decreased by 44.0% (95% CI 36.4%–52.8%, p < 0.001) in the first three months of 2020 compared with the monthly average admission in 2015–2019. Compare to same period of previous years, AECOPD decreased by 1.0% with each percent of increased masking (p < 0.001) and decreased by 3.0% with increase in 1 °C in temperature (p = 0.045). The numbers of admissions for control diagnoses (heart failure, intestinal obstruction and iron deficiency anaemia) in the same period in 2020 were not reduced. Conclusions: The number of admissions for AECOPD decreased in first three months of 2020, compared with previous years. This was observed with increased masking percentage and social distancing in Hong Kong. We postulated universal masking and social distancing during COVID-19 pandemics both contributed in preventing respiratory tract infections hence AECOPD.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/rmed-
dc.relation.ispartofRespiratory Medicine-
dc.subjectChronic obstructive pulmonary disease-
dc.subjectCoronavirus disease 2019-
dc.subjectHospitalization-
dc.titleSignificant reduction in hospital admissions for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in Hong Kong during coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailHo, JCM: jhocm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, DCL: dcllam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTam, TCC: tamcct@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, MSM: msmip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, PL: plho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, JCM=rp00258-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, DCL=rp01345-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, MSM=rp00347-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, PL=rp00406-
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.rmed.2020.106085-
dc.identifier.pmid32917356-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7354382-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85088050692-
dc.identifier.hkuros314293-
dc.identifier.volume171-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 106085-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 106085-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000573923200002-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0954-6111-

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