File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: The 12-month prevalence of psychotic experiences and their association with clinical outcomes in Hong Kong: an epidemiological and a 2-year follow up studies

TitleThe 12-month prevalence of psychotic experiences and their association with clinical outcomes in Hong Kong: an epidemiological and a 2-year follow up studies
Authors
KeywordsDose-dependent effect
hallucination
latent class analysis
persistent psychotic experience
Issue Date2020
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM
Citation
Psychological Medicine, 2020, Epub 2020-05-29, p. 1-8 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The relationship between the subtypes of psychotic experiences (PEs) and common mental health symptoms remains unclear. The current study aims to establish the 12-month prevalence of PEs in a representative sample of community-dwelling Chinese population in Hong Kong and explore the relationship of types of PEs and common mental health symptoms. Method: This is a population-based two-phase household survey of Chinese population in Hong Kong aged 16–75 (N = 5719) conducted between 2010 and 2013 and a 2-year follow-up study of PEs positive subjects (N = 152). PEs were measured with Psychosis Screening Questionnaire (PSQ) and subjects who endorsed any item on the PSQ without a clinical diagnosis of psychotic disorder were considered as PE-positive. Types of PEs were characterized using a number of PEs (single v. multiple) and latent class analysis. All PE-positive subjects were assessed with common mental health symptoms and suicidal ideations at baseline and 2-year follow-up. PE status was also assessed at 2-year follow-up. Results: The 12-month prevalence of PEs in Hong Kong was 2.7% with 21.1% had multiple PEs. Three latent classes of PEs were identified: hallucination, paranoia and mixed. Multiple PEs and hallucination latent class of PEs were associated with higher levels of common mental health symptoms. PE persistent rate at 2-year follow-up was 15.1%. Multiple PEs was associated with poorer mental health at 2-year follow-up. Conclusions: Results highlighted the transient and heterogeneous nature of PEs, and that multiple PEs and hallucination subtype of PEs may be specific indices of poorer common mental health.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282835
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 5.813
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.843

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, SKW-
dc.contributor.authorLee, KKW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, VHY-
dc.contributor.authorPang, HH-
dc.contributor.authorWong, CSM-
dc.contributor.authorHui, CLM-
dc.contributor.authorChang, WC-
dc.contributor.authorLee, EHM-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WC-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, EFC-
dc.contributor.authorChiu, HFK-
dc.contributor.authorChiang, TP-
dc.contributor.authorLam, M-
dc.contributor.authorLau, JTF-
dc.contributor.authorNg, RMK-
dc.contributor.authorHung, SF-
dc.contributor.authorLam, LCW-
dc.contributor.authorChen, EYH-
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-05T06:22:07Z-
dc.date.available2020-06-05T06:22:07Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationPsychological Medicine, 2020, Epub 2020-05-29, p. 1-8-
dc.identifier.issn0033-2917-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/282835-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The relationship between the subtypes of psychotic experiences (PEs) and common mental health symptoms remains unclear. The current study aims to establish the 12-month prevalence of PEs in a representative sample of community-dwelling Chinese population in Hong Kong and explore the relationship of types of PEs and common mental health symptoms. Method: This is a population-based two-phase household survey of Chinese population in Hong Kong aged 16–75 (N = 5719) conducted between 2010 and 2013 and a 2-year follow-up study of PEs positive subjects (N = 152). PEs were measured with Psychosis Screening Questionnaire (PSQ) and subjects who endorsed any item on the PSQ without a clinical diagnosis of psychotic disorder were considered as PE-positive. Types of PEs were characterized using a number of PEs (single v. multiple) and latent class analysis. All PE-positive subjects were assessed with common mental health symptoms and suicidal ideations at baseline and 2-year follow-up. PE status was also assessed at 2-year follow-up. Results: The 12-month prevalence of PEs in Hong Kong was 2.7% with 21.1% had multiple PEs. Three latent classes of PEs were identified: hallucination, paranoia and mixed. Multiple PEs and hallucination latent class of PEs were associated with higher levels of common mental health symptoms. PE persistent rate at 2-year follow-up was 15.1%. Multiple PEs was associated with poorer mental health at 2-year follow-up. Conclusions: Results highlighted the transient and heterogeneous nature of PEs, and that multiple PEs and hallucination subtype of PEs may be specific indices of poorer common mental health.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=PSM-
dc.relation.ispartofPsychological Medicine-
dc.rightsPsychological Medicine. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsThis article has been published in a revised form in [Journal] [http://doi.org/XXX]. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © copyright holder.-
dc.subjectDose-dependent effect-
dc.subjecthallucination-
dc.subjectlatent class analysis-
dc.subjectpersistent psychotic experience-
dc.titleThe 12-month prevalence of psychotic experiences and their association with clinical outcomes in Hong Kong: an epidemiological and a 2-year follow up studies-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SKW: kwsherry@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, VHY: hchan14@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPang, HH: herbpang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, CSM: wongcsm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHui, CLM: christyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChang, WC: changwc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, EHM: edwinlhm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, WC: waicchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, EYH: eyhchen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SKW=rp00539-
dc.identifier.authorityPang, HH=rp01857-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, CSM=rp02625-
dc.identifier.authorityHui, CLM=rp01993-
dc.identifier.authorityChang, WC=rp01465-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, EHM=rp01575-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, WC=rp01687-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, EYH=rp00392-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0033291720001452-
dc.identifier.pmid32466813-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85085753892-
dc.identifier.hkuros310257-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-05-29-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage8-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats