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Article: Impact of household composition and satisfaction with family life on self-reported sexual health outcomes of high-school students in Hong Kong

TitleImpact of household composition and satisfaction with family life on self-reported sexual health outcomes of high-school students in Hong Kong
Authors
Keywordsepidemiology
needs assessment
sex education
teenagers
Issue Date2020
PublisherBMJ Group. The Journal's web site is located at https://srh.bmj.com/
Citation
BMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health, 2020, v. 46 n. 3, p. 184-191 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground The study aimed to examine the impact of household composition and satisfaction with family life on sexual behaviours among high school male and female students (aged 11–22 years) in Hong Kong. Method High schools were randomly selected, and the final sample comprised 25 schools. Students were divided into two groups ('living with both biological parents' vs 'not living with both biological parents'). Students were asked to rate their satisfaction with family life on a five-point Likert scale in a self-administered questionnaire. Dependent variables were sexual experience, sexual harassment, sexting and nude chats. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the results. Results 3907 students were included in the analysis. 202 students (5.2%) were sexually active. 505 students had ever (13.0%) sexually harassed others and 303 students (7.8%) had ever been sexually harassed by others. 58 students (1.5%) had ever had nude chats. 1005 students (25.8%) had sexted in the last 12 months. Students who lived with both biological parents were less like to be sexually active, to sext and to have nude chats than those who did not. Students who had higher family life satisfaction were less likely to be sexually active, to sexually harass others, to be sexually harassed by others, to sext and to have nude chats than students who had lower satisfaction with their family life. Conclusions Sexual health programmes and interventions should consider family functioning. Students who have low family satisfaction and those who do not live with both their biological parents should be targeted for sexual health interventions.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275345
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.125

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWong, WCW-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, EPH-
dc.contributor.authorHolroyd, E-
dc.contributor.authorIp, P-
dc.contributor.authorFan, S-
dc.contributor.authorYip, PSF-
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-10T02:40:41Z-
dc.date.available2019-09-10T02:40:41Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationBMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health, 2020, v. 46 n. 3, p. 184-191-
dc.identifier.issn2515-1991-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/275345-
dc.description.abstractBackground The study aimed to examine the impact of household composition and satisfaction with family life on sexual behaviours among high school male and female students (aged 11–22 years) in Hong Kong. Method High schools were randomly selected, and the final sample comprised 25 schools. Students were divided into two groups ('living with both biological parents' vs 'not living with both biological parents'). Students were asked to rate their satisfaction with family life on a five-point Likert scale in a self-administered questionnaire. Dependent variables were sexual experience, sexual harassment, sexting and nude chats. Multiple logistic regression was used to analyse the results. Results 3907 students were included in the analysis. 202 students (5.2%) were sexually active. 505 students had ever (13.0%) sexually harassed others and 303 students (7.8%) had ever been sexually harassed by others. 58 students (1.5%) had ever had nude chats. 1005 students (25.8%) had sexted in the last 12 months. Students who lived with both biological parents were less like to be sexually active, to sext and to have nude chats than those who did not. Students who had higher family life satisfaction were less likely to be sexually active, to sexually harass others, to be sexually harassed by others, to sext and to have nude chats than students who had lower satisfaction with their family life. Conclusions Sexual health programmes and interventions should consider family functioning. Students who have low family satisfaction and those who do not live with both their biological parents should be targeted for sexual health interventions.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherBMJ Group. The Journal's web site is located at https://srh.bmj.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofBMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health-
dc.rightsBMJ Sexual & Reproductive Health. Copyright © BMJ Group.-
dc.rightsThis article has been accepted for publication in [Journal, Year] following peer review, and the Version of Record can be accessed online at [insert full DOI eg. http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/xxxxx]. [© Authors (or their employer(s)) OR © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd ( for assignments of BMJ Case Reports)] <year>-
dc.subjectepidemiology-
dc.subjectneeds assessment-
dc.subjectsex education-
dc.subjectteenagers-
dc.titleImpact of household composition and satisfaction with family life on self-reported sexual health outcomes of high-school students in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChoi, EPH: ephchoi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, P: patricip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYip, PSF: sfpyip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, WCW: wongwcw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChoi, EPH=rp02329-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, P=rp01337-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, PSF=rp00596-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, WCW=rp01457-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmjsrh-2019-200372-
dc.identifier.pmid31754063-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85075609413-
dc.identifier.hkuros303215-
dc.identifier.hkuros309728-
dc.identifier.volume46-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage184-
dc.identifier.epage191-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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