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Article: Perceived family relationship quality and use of poly-tobacco products during early and late adolescence

TitlePerceived family relationship quality and use of poly-tobacco products during early and late adolescence
Authors
KeywordsAdolescent
Electronic cigarette
Family
Hookah
Smokeless tobacco
Smoking
Issue Date2018
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/addictbeh
Citation
Addictive Behaviors, 2018, v. 85, p. 38-42 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: The role of family relationship in adolescent use of emerging tobacco products, which have become increasingly popular, is unknown. We examined the associations of perceived family relationship quality with current use of poly-tobacco products including cigarettes, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), waterpipe and smokeless tobacco in adolescents. Methods: Data from a representative sample of 42,250 US grade 7–12 equivalent students (mean ± SD age 14.6 ± 1.9 years; 51.3% boys) from 75 randomly selected secondary schools in Hong Kong (2012−13) were analysed. Logistic regressions yielded adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for current (past 30-day) use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, waterpipe, smokeless tobacco and poly-tobacco (≥2 products) in relation to perceived family relationship quality, adjusted for age, sex, perceived family affluence, parental education, family structure, parental and sibling smoking and secondhand smoke exposure at home. Subgroup analyses were conducted to compare the associations in early (aged ≤14 years) versus late (>14) adolescents. Results: The odds of current use increased with worse perceived family relationship quality with AORs (95% confidence interval) of up to 2.92 (2.32–3.68) for cigarettes, 7.28 (4.71–11.2) for e-cigarettes, 5.04 (3.44–7.40) for waterpipe, 8.09 (4.87–13.4) for smokeless tobacco and 5.25 (3.45–8.01) for poly-tobacco products use (all P for trend <.001). The associations for all tobacco use outcomes were stronger in early than late adolescents (all P for interaction <.001). Conclusions: Dose-response relationships were found between negatively perceived family relationship quality and current poly- and individual tobacco product use by Hong Kong Chinese secondary students. The associations were stronger for alternative tobacco products and in early adolescents.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/254624
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.913
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.520
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLuk, TT-
dc.contributor.authorWang, MP-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, LT-
dc.contributor.authorChen, J-
dc.contributor.authorWu, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLam, TH-
dc.contributor.authorHo, DSY-
dc.date.accessioned2018-06-21T01:03:33Z-
dc.date.available2018-06-21T01:03:33Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationAddictive Behaviors, 2018, v. 85, p. 38-42-
dc.identifier.issn0306-4603-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/254624-
dc.description.abstractBackground: The role of family relationship in adolescent use of emerging tobacco products, which have become increasingly popular, is unknown. We examined the associations of perceived family relationship quality with current use of poly-tobacco products including cigarettes, electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), waterpipe and smokeless tobacco in adolescents. Methods: Data from a representative sample of 42,250 US grade 7–12 equivalent students (mean ± SD age 14.6 ± 1.9 years; 51.3% boys) from 75 randomly selected secondary schools in Hong Kong (2012−13) were analysed. Logistic regressions yielded adjusted odds ratios (AORs) for current (past 30-day) use of cigarettes, e-cigarettes, waterpipe, smokeless tobacco and poly-tobacco (≥2 products) in relation to perceived family relationship quality, adjusted for age, sex, perceived family affluence, parental education, family structure, parental and sibling smoking and secondhand smoke exposure at home. Subgroup analyses were conducted to compare the associations in early (aged ≤14 years) versus late (>14) adolescents. Results: The odds of current use increased with worse perceived family relationship quality with AORs (95% confidence interval) of up to 2.92 (2.32–3.68) for cigarettes, 7.28 (4.71–11.2) for e-cigarettes, 5.04 (3.44–7.40) for waterpipe, 8.09 (4.87–13.4) for smokeless tobacco and 5.25 (3.45–8.01) for poly-tobacco products use (all P for trend <.001). The associations for all tobacco use outcomes were stronger in early than late adolescents (all P for interaction <.001). Conclusions: Dose-response relationships were found between negatively perceived family relationship quality and current poly- and individual tobacco product use by Hong Kong Chinese secondary students. The associations were stronger for alternative tobacco products and in early adolescents.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/addictbeh-
dc.relation.ispartofAddictive Behaviors-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectAdolescent-
dc.subjectElectronic cigarette-
dc.subjectFamily-
dc.subjectHookah-
dc.subjectSmokeless tobacco-
dc.subjectSmoking-
dc.titlePerceived family relationship quality and use of poly-tobacco products during early and late adolescence-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWang, MP: mpwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, TH: hrmrlth@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, DSY: syho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, MP=rp01863-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TH=rp00326-
dc.identifier.authorityHo, DSY=rp00427-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.05.011-
dc.identifier.pmid29843039-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85047447202-
dc.identifier.hkuros285396-
dc.identifier.volume85-
dc.identifier.spage38-
dc.identifier.epage42-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000438002500007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0306-4603-

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