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Article: Microsatellite instability in mitochondrial genome of common female cancers
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TitleMicrosatellite instability in mitochondrial genome of common female cancers
 
AuthorsWang, Y1
Liu, VWS1 1
Tsang, PCK1
Chiu, PM1
Cheung, ANY1
Khoo, US1
Nagley, P2
Ngan, HYS1
 
KeywordsBreast cancer
Gynecological cancer
Mitochondrial DNA
Mitochondrial microsatellite instability
 
Issue Date2006
 
PublisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijgc.net/
 
CitationInternational Journal Of Gynecological Cancer, 2006, v. 16 SUPPL. 1, p. 259-266 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1438.2006.00412.x
 
AbstractTo investigate the occurrence of mitochondrial genome instability in primary cervical, endometrial, ovarian, and breast carcinomas, we analyzed 12 microsatellite regions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of tumor tissues and their matched normal controls. Four of the 12 microsatellite markers starting at nucleotide position (np) 303, 514, 956, and 16184, respectively, exhibited instability as indicated by the change in length of short base-repetitive sequences of mtDNA in cancer tissue relative to that in control normal tissue from the same patient. About 25.4% of cervical cancers, 48.4% of endometrial cancers, 21.9% of ovarian cancers, and 29.4% of breast cancers carried one or more mitochondrial microsatellite instability (mtMSI). mtMSI was frequently detected in the D-loop region but rarely occurred in the coding region. A relatively long C tract interrupted by a T residue is the mtMSI hot spot in all four types of cancer studied. Different tumors have different mtMSI profiles. In particular, the frequency of mtMSI in endometrial cancer was significantly higher than in the other three types of cancer. Furthermore, carriers of a germ-line T to C polymorphism at np 16189 could be more susceptible to breast cancer development in light of the higher frequency detected in cancer patients than in normal individuals. © 2006, IGCS.
 
ISSN1048-891X
2012 Impact Factor: 1.941
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.762
 
DOIhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1438.2006.00412.x
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000236269900042
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorLiu, VWS
 
dc.contributor.authorTsang, PCK
 
dc.contributor.authorChiu, PM
 
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ANY
 
dc.contributor.authorKhoo, US
 
dc.contributor.authorNagley, P
 
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYS
 
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T09:27:53Z
 
dc.date.available2010-09-06T09:27:53Z
 
dc.date.issued2006
 
dc.description.abstractTo investigate the occurrence of mitochondrial genome instability in primary cervical, endometrial, ovarian, and breast carcinomas, we analyzed 12 microsatellite regions in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of tumor tissues and their matched normal controls. Four of the 12 microsatellite markers starting at nucleotide position (np) 303, 514, 956, and 16184, respectively, exhibited instability as indicated by the change in length of short base-repetitive sequences of mtDNA in cancer tissue relative to that in control normal tissue from the same patient. About 25.4% of cervical cancers, 48.4% of endometrial cancers, 21.9% of ovarian cancers, and 29.4% of breast cancers carried one or more mitochondrial microsatellite instability (mtMSI). mtMSI was frequently detected in the D-loop region but rarely occurred in the coding region. A relatively long C tract interrupted by a T residue is the mtMSI hot spot in all four types of cancer studied. Different tumors have different mtMSI profiles. In particular, the frequency of mtMSI in endometrial cancer was significantly higher than in the other three types of cancer. Furthermore, carriers of a germ-line T to C polymorphism at np 16189 could be more susceptible to breast cancer development in light of the higher frequency detected in cancer patients than in normal individuals. © 2006, IGCS.
 
dc.description.natureLink_to_subscribed_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal Of Gynecological Cancer, 2006, v. 16 SUPPL. 1, p. 259-266 [How to Cite?]
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1438.2006.00412.x
 
dc.identifier.doihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1525-1438.2006.00412.x
 
dc.identifier.epage266
 
dc.identifier.hkuros113123
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000236269900042
 
dc.identifier.issn1048-891X
2012 Impact Factor: 1.941
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.762
 
dc.identifier.issueSUPPL. 1
 
dc.identifier.openurl
 
dc.identifier.pmid16515601
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33645356201
 
dc.identifier.spage259
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/87299
 
dc.identifier.volume16
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherLippincott Williams & Wilkins. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.ijgc.net/
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Gynecological Cancer
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAdenocarcinoma - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshBreast Neoplasms - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshDNA, Mitochondrial - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshEndometrial Neoplasms - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshFemale
 
dc.subject.meshGenital Neoplasms, Female - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshGenomic Instability - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshHumans
 
dc.subject.meshMicrosatellite Repeats - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshMutation
 
dc.subject.meshOvarian Neoplasms - genetics
 
dc.subject.meshPolymorphism, Genetic
 
dc.subject.meshUterine Cervical Neoplasms - genetics
 
dc.subjectBreast cancer
 
dc.subjectGynecological cancer
 
dc.subjectMitochondrial DNA
 
dc.subjectMitochondrial microsatellite instability
 
dc.titleMicrosatellite instability in mitochondrial genome of common female cancers
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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<contributor.author>Cheung, ANY</contributor.author>
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong
  2. Monash University