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Article: Spousal renal donor transplantation in Chinese subjects: A 10 year experience from a single centre

TitleSpousal renal donor transplantation in Chinese subjects: A 10 year experience from a single centre
Authors
KeywordsEthics
Living-related donor
Outcome
Renal transplantation
Spousal donor
Issue Date2004
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Nephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 2004, v. 19 n. 1, p. 203-206 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground. The shortage of cadaveric kidneys for renal transplantation is a particularly problematic situation in the locality of Hong Kong. Kidneys from spousal donors are therefore increasingly being used for transplantation. This study was undertaken to evaluate the outcome of spousal donor transplant recipients in comparison with that of genetically related living donor (LRD) allograft recipients. Methods. From 1988, we have transplanted 22 spousal kidney recipients (group 1). All donors must demonstrate a genuine spousal relationship. Their outcome was compared with that of 24 LRD allograft recipients (group 2) transplanted in the same period with similar demographics, pre-transplant dialysis duration, immunosuppressive protocol and length of post-transplant follow-up. Results. The mean (±SD) age was 36.5 ± 8 and 32.5 ± 6 years for groups 1 and 2, who were followed for 56.6 ± 35 and 59.1 ± 38 months, respectively. There was no difference in the incidence of delayed graft function, acute rejection and serum creatinine level at 5 years. Graft survival rates were 86.4 and 79.2% (P=0.56), while patient survival rates were 100 and 91.7% (P=0.171) at 5 years for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusions. Spousal kidney transplantation shares comparable results with LRD transplantation and should be encouraged in places where cadaveric organs remain scarce. Stringent measures must be implemented to prevent the possible emergence of kidney bartering and to protect the interests of living donors. The ethical and social issues regarding the spousal donor in Hong Kong and other countries are discussed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77897
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.085
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.780
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorTang, Sen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLui, SLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, CYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLo, WKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorCheng, IKPen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLai, KNen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, TMen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:36:57Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:36:57Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationNephrology Dialysis Transplantation, 2004, v. 19 n. 1, p. 203-206en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0931-0509en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77897-
dc.description.abstractBackground. The shortage of cadaveric kidneys for renal transplantation is a particularly problematic situation in the locality of Hong Kong. Kidneys from spousal donors are therefore increasingly being used for transplantation. This study was undertaken to evaluate the outcome of spousal donor transplant recipients in comparison with that of genetically related living donor (LRD) allograft recipients. Methods. From 1988, we have transplanted 22 spousal kidney recipients (group 1). All donors must demonstrate a genuine spousal relationship. Their outcome was compared with that of 24 LRD allograft recipients (group 2) transplanted in the same period with similar demographics, pre-transplant dialysis duration, immunosuppressive protocol and length of post-transplant follow-up. Results. The mean (±SD) age was 36.5 ± 8 and 32.5 ± 6 years for groups 1 and 2, who were followed for 56.6 ± 35 and 59.1 ± 38 months, respectively. There was no difference in the incidence of delayed graft function, acute rejection and serum creatinine level at 5 years. Graft survival rates were 86.4 and 79.2% (P=0.56), while patient survival rates were 100 and 91.7% (P=0.171) at 5 years for groups 1 and 2, respectively. Conclusions. Spousal kidney transplantation shares comparable results with LRD transplantation and should be encouraged in places where cadaveric organs remain scarce. Stringent measures must be implemented to prevent the possible emergence of kidney bartering and to protect the interests of living donors. The ethical and social issues regarding the spousal donor in Hong Kong and other countries are discussed.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://ndt.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofNephrology Dialysis Transplantationen_HK
dc.rightsNephrology, Dialysis, Transplantation. Copyright © Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.subjectEthicsen_HK
dc.subjectLiving-related donoren_HK
dc.subjectOutcomeen_HK
dc.subjectRenal transplantationen_HK
dc.subjectSpousal donoren_HK
dc.subject.meshAdulten_HK
dc.subject.meshEthics, Medicalen_HK
dc.subject.meshFamilyen_HK
dc.subject.meshFemaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshGraft Survivalen_HK
dc.subject.meshHong Kongen_HK
dc.subject.meshHumansen_HK
dc.subject.meshKidney Failure, Chronic - therapyen_HK
dc.subject.meshKidney Transplantation - ethics - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshLiving Donors - ethics - supply & distributionen_HK
dc.subject.meshMaleen_HK
dc.subject.meshSpousesen_HK
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcomeen_HK
dc.titleSpousal renal donor transplantation in Chinese subjects: A 10 year experience from a single centreen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0931-0509&volume=19&issue=1&spage=203&epage=206&date=2004&atitle=Spousal+renal+donor+transplantation+in+Chinese+subjects:+a+10+year+experience+from+a+single+centreen_HK
dc.identifier.emailTang, S: scwtang@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLai, KN: knlai@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, TM: dtmchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTang, S=rp00480en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLai, KN=rp00324en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, TM=rp00394en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/ndt/gfg492en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid14671058en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-0346025540en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros87422en_HK
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-0346025540&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume19en_HK
dc.identifier.issue1en_HK
dc.identifier.spage203en_HK
dc.identifier.epage206en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000187837400031-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTang, S=7403437082en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLui, SL=7102379130en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, CY=7401771743en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLo, WK=7201502414en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheng, IKP=7102537483en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLai, KN=7402135706en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TM=7402687700en_HK

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