File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Non-tuberculous mycobacterial infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus

TitleNon-tuberculous mycobacterial infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus
Authors
KeywordsImmunocompromised host
Infection
Mycobacterium
Synovitis
Issue Date2007
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.org/
Citation
Rheumatology, 2007, v. 46 n. 2, p. 280-284 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are susceptible to opportunistic infections. To examine the clinical manifestations of non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections with those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infections in SLE patients. Methods. Medical records of a cohort of 725 SLE patients were reviewed for previous NTM infections. Demographic characteristics, predisposing factors and clinical outcomes were compared with patients who had previous MTB infections (n = 39). Results. Eleven (nine female and two male) cases were identified (prevalence 1.5%). The mean ± s.d. age at the time of infection was 42.8 ± 13.9 yrs, 9.3 ± 5.8 yrs after the onset of SLE. The mean ± s.d. time taken from onset of symptoms to the diagnosis of NTM infection was 5.7 ± 7.2 months. Sites of involvement included skin and soft tissue (n = 8), chest (n = 2) and disseminated infection (n = 1). NTM infections were more likely to involve extrapulmonary sites (P = 0.006), presented in patients with longer lupus disease duration (P < 0.001), occurred in older patients (P < 0.001) and in those who had a higher cumulative dose of prednisolone (P = 0.01) than MTB infections. Using a stepwise logistic regression, disease duration was found to be the only independent predictive factor (P = 0.005) for NTM infections. Ten (25.6%) patients with MTB infections but none of the patients with NTM infections presented concomitantly at the onset of SLE (P = 0.09). There were no differences in the recurrence rate (P = 0.64) and frequency of disseminated infections (P = 0.40) between NTM and MTB infections. Conclusions. NTM infections tended to develop in SLE patients later in their disease course than MTB infections. A high index of suspicion is required for its diagnosis. © 2007 Oxford University Press.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77865
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 4.524
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.449
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMok, MYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, SSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChan, TMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorWong, WSen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLau, CSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2010-09-06T07:36:35Z-
dc.date.available2010-09-06T07:36:35Z-
dc.date.issued2007en_HK
dc.identifier.citationRheumatology, 2007, v. 46 n. 2, p. 280-284en_HK
dc.identifier.issn1462-0324en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/77865-
dc.description.abstractObjectives. Patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are susceptible to opportunistic infections. To examine the clinical manifestations of non-tuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infections with those of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) infections in SLE patients. Methods. Medical records of a cohort of 725 SLE patients were reviewed for previous NTM infections. Demographic characteristics, predisposing factors and clinical outcomes were compared with patients who had previous MTB infections (n = 39). Results. Eleven (nine female and two male) cases were identified (prevalence 1.5%). The mean ± s.d. age at the time of infection was 42.8 ± 13.9 yrs, 9.3 ± 5.8 yrs after the onset of SLE. The mean ± s.d. time taken from onset of symptoms to the diagnosis of NTM infection was 5.7 ± 7.2 months. Sites of involvement included skin and soft tissue (n = 8), chest (n = 2) and disseminated infection (n = 1). NTM infections were more likely to involve extrapulmonary sites (P = 0.006), presented in patients with longer lupus disease duration (P < 0.001), occurred in older patients (P < 0.001) and in those who had a higher cumulative dose of prednisolone (P = 0.01) than MTB infections. Using a stepwise logistic regression, disease duration was found to be the only independent predictive factor (P = 0.005) for NTM infections. Ten (25.6%) patients with MTB infections but none of the patients with NTM infections presented concomitantly at the onset of SLE (P = 0.09). There were no differences in the recurrence rate (P = 0.64) and frequency of disseminated infections (P = 0.40) between NTM and MTB infections. Conclusions. NTM infections tended to develop in SLE patients later in their disease course than MTB infections. A high index of suspicion is required for its diagnosis. © 2007 Oxford University Press.en_HK
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://rheumatology.oxfordjournals.org/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofRheumatologyen_HK
dc.rightsRheumatology. Copyright © Oxford University Press.-
dc.subjectImmunocompromised hosten_HK
dc.subjectInfectionen_HK
dc.subjectMycobacteriumen_HK
dc.subjectSynovitisen_HK
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshLupus Erythematosus, Systemic - complications-
dc.subject.meshMycobacterium Infections, Atypical - complications - diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshOpportunistic Infections - complications - diagnosis-
dc.titleNon-tuberculous mycobacterial infection in patients with systemic lupus erythematosusen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=1462-0324&volume=46&issue=2&spage=280&epage=284&date=2007&atitle=Non-tuberculous+mycobacterial+infection+in+patients+with+systemic+lupus+erythematosusen_HK
dc.identifier.emailMok, MY: temy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailWong, SSY: samsonsy@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailChan, TM: dtmchan@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailLau, CS: cslau@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityMok, MY=rp00490en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWong, SSY=rp00395en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityChan, TM=rp00394en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityLau, CS=rp01348en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/rheumatology/kel206en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid16861709en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-33846682058en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros137983en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros135277-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-33846682058&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume46en_HK
dc.identifier.issue2en_HK
dc.identifier.spage280en_HK
dc.identifier.epage284en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000243810100018-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridMok, MY=7006024184en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, SSY=13310021400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChan, TM=7402687700en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridFong, DYT=35261710300en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWong, WS=8737892100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLau, CS=14035682100en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike1070883-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats