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Article: Chromosome in situ hybridisation, Ki-67, and telomerase immunocytochemistry in liquid based cervical cytology

TitleChromosome in situ hybridisation, Ki-67, and telomerase immunocytochemistry in liquid based cervical cytology
Authors
Issue Date2004
PublisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcp.bmjjournals.com/
Citation
Journal Of Clinical Pathology, 2004, v. 57 n. 7, p. 721-727 How to Cite?
AbstractAims: To assess the potential value of chromosome in situ hybridisation (CISH), Ki-67, and telomerase immunocytochemistry in liquid based cervical cytology to help detect carcinoma cells and precursors. Method: Sixty ThinPrep processed cervical cytology samples were studied: 23 cases within the normal limit, 13 low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 10 high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), six squamous cell carcinomas, three endocervical adenocarcinomas, two cervical adenosquamous cell carcinomas, and three endometrial adenocarcinomas. CISH was performed with DNA probes specific for the pericentromeric regions of chromosome 11 and 16. Hybridisation signals were visualised with the streptavidin-biotin peroxidase technique. The monoclonal MIB1 and polyclonal TRT-H231 antibodies were used to detect Ki-67 and telomerase immunoreactivity, respectively. Results: Non-specific background staining was almost absent in CISH slides. Normal squamous and glandular cells showed a diploid chromosomal pattern. A relative gain in chromosomes 11 and 16 (aneusomy) was seen in HSIL and the carcinomas (p<0.0001 ). In MIB1 stained smears, normal cells and koilocytes showed inconspicuous immunoreactivity, whereas strongly immunoreactive nuclei were found in cancer cells and HSIL (p<0.0001). Not only carcinoma and HSIL cells, but also some normal cells, showed cytoplasmic staining for telomerase. Conclusions: These preliminary results indicate that ThinPrep processed cervical smears are suitable for CISH and immunocytochemical studies. The neoplastic squamous and glandular cells were easily identified based on nuclear aneusomy and strong Ki-67 immuoreactivity in the context of abnormal nuclear morphology. This is the first study to apply CISH in cervical cytology using an immunoenzymatic approach.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43593
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 2.912
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.260
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID
References

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorCheung, ANYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorChiu, PMen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTsun, KLen_HK
dc.contributor.authorKhoo, USen_HK
dc.contributor.authorLeung, BSYen_HK
dc.contributor.authorNgan, HYSen_HK
dc.date.accessioned2007-03-23T04:49:50Z-
dc.date.available2007-03-23T04:49:50Z-
dc.date.issued2004en_HK
dc.identifier.citationJournal Of Clinical Pathology, 2004, v. 57 n. 7, p. 721-727en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0021-9746en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/43593-
dc.description.abstractAims: To assess the potential value of chromosome in situ hybridisation (CISH), Ki-67, and telomerase immunocytochemistry in liquid based cervical cytology to help detect carcinoma cells and precursors. Method: Sixty ThinPrep processed cervical cytology samples were studied: 23 cases within the normal limit, 13 low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 10 high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), six squamous cell carcinomas, three endocervical adenocarcinomas, two cervical adenosquamous cell carcinomas, and three endometrial adenocarcinomas. CISH was performed with DNA probes specific for the pericentromeric regions of chromosome 11 and 16. Hybridisation signals were visualised with the streptavidin-biotin peroxidase technique. The monoclonal MIB1 and polyclonal TRT-H231 antibodies were used to detect Ki-67 and telomerase immunoreactivity, respectively. Results: Non-specific background staining was almost absent in CISH slides. Normal squamous and glandular cells showed a diploid chromosomal pattern. A relative gain in chromosomes 11 and 16 (aneusomy) was seen in HSIL and the carcinomas (p<0.0001 ). In MIB1 stained smears, normal cells and koilocytes showed inconspicuous immunoreactivity, whereas strongly immunoreactive nuclei were found in cancer cells and HSIL (p<0.0001). Not only carcinoma and HSIL cells, but also some normal cells, showed cytoplasmic staining for telomerase. Conclusions: These preliminary results indicate that ThinPrep processed cervical smears are suitable for CISH and immunocytochemical studies. The neoplastic squamous and glandular cells were easily identified based on nuclear aneusomy and strong Ki-67 immuoreactivity in the context of abnormal nuclear morphology. This is the first study to apply CISH in cervical cytology using an immunoenzymatic approach.en_HK
dc.format.extent196203 bytes-
dc.format.extent3013 bytes-
dc.format.mimetypeapplication/pdf-
dc.format.mimetypetext/plain-
dc.languageengen_HK
dc.publisherB M J Publishing Group. The Journal's web site is located at http://jcp.bmjjournals.com/en_HK
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Clinical Pathologyen_HK
dc.rightsCreative Commons: Attribution 3.0 Hong Kong License-
dc.rightsJournal of Clinical Pathology. Copyright © B M J Publishing Group.en_HK
dc.subject.meshChromosomes, human, pair 11 - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshChromosomes, human, pair 16 - geneticsen_HK
dc.subject.meshIn situ hybridization - methodsen_HK
dc.subject.meshTumor markers, biological - metabolismen_HK
dc.subject.meshUterine cervical neoplasms - diagnosis - geneticsen_HK
dc.titleChromosome in situ hybridisation, Ki-67, and telomerase immunocytochemistry in liquid based cervical cytologyen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.openurlhttp://library.hku.hk:4550/resserv?sid=HKU:IR&issn=0021-9746&volume=57&issue=7&spage=721&epage=727&date=2004&atitle=Chromosome+in+situ+hybridisation,+Ki-67,+and+telomerase+immunocytochemistry+in+liquid+based+cervical+cytologyen_HK
dc.identifier.emailCheung, ANY:anycheun@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailKhoo, US:uskhoo@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailNgan, HYS:hysngan@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, ANY=rp00542en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityKhoo, US=rp00362en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityNgan, HYS=rp00346en_HK
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_versionen_HK
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/jcp.2003.013730en_HK
dc.identifier.pmid15220365-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC1770363-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-3142514396en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros94877-
dc.relation.referenceshttp://www.scopus.com/mlt/select.url?eid=2-s2.0-3142514396&selection=ref&src=s&origin=recordpageen_HK
dc.identifier.volume57en_HK
dc.identifier.issue7en_HK
dc.identifier.spage721en_HK
dc.identifier.epage727en_HK
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000222268000010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridCheung, ANY=54927484100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridChiu, PM=7103182596en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTsun, KL=6506326338en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridKhoo, US=7004195799en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridLeung, BSY=36836700400en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridNgan, HYS=34571944100en_HK

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