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Conference Paper: Findings of a longitudinal cohort study on depressive disorders in Hong Kong’s primary care

TitleFindings of a longitudinal cohort study on depressive disorders in Hong Kong’s primary care
Authors
KeywordsPrimary care
Epidemiology
Depression
Cohort
Health-related quality of life
Issue Date2014
PublisherAcademy of Family Physicians of Malaysia. The Journal's web site is located at http://e-mfp.org/
Citation
The 2014 WONCA Asia Pacific Regional Conference, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia, 21-24 May 2014. In Malaysian Family Physician, 2014, v. 9 suppl. 1, p. 29-30, abstract no. OP13 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: The primary care setting is the entry point for most people into the health system and primary care physicians are ideally placed to serve as the central service provider for patients with depression. Unfortunately, there are many challenges identifying and managing depression in primary care and long-term outcomes and factors affecting prognosis remain unclear. To make recommendations regarding mental health policy, it is necessary to have a current knowledge of the epidemiology and outcomes of depressive disorders in patients presenting to primary care. Methods A cross-sectional followed by a longitudinal cohort study was conducted. Adult patients recruited from the waiting rooms of 59 primary care doctors completed a questionnaire which screened for depression. Doctors provided clinical information about the patient. Consenting patients were followed up by telephone at 3, 6 and 12 months. Results 10,179 subjects were recruited at baseline (response rate 81.0%). 4358 subjects entered the longitudinal study (response rate 42.8%). The cross-sectional prevalence of PHQ-screened depression was 10.69%, 12-month incidence was 6.67% and 12-month remission rate was 60.31%. Detection rate by doctors was 23.1%. Over one year, the health –related quality of life scores improved by 10% (SF-12v2 PCS) and 30% (SF-12v2 MCS). Patient-reported medication and primary care service use was increased; however, mental health service use was low. The most common patient-reported mental health service used was psychiatrists; the most common referral service used by doctors was for counselling. Conclusions Most cases of depression encountered in primary care are mild and self-limiting, but associated with significant impairment to health-related quality of life. Diagnosis of depression by a doctor does not appear to have any significant effect on resolution of symptoms and quality of life after 1 year but is associated with greater improvements in mental health-related quality of life.
DescriptionOral presentation
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199825
ISSN
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.151

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChin, WYen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, CLKen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, SYSen_US
dc.contributor.authorLo, YYCen_US
dc.contributor.authorFong, DYTen_US
dc.contributor.authorLam, TPen_US
dc.contributor.authorLee, PWHen_US
dc.contributor.authorWong, JGWSen_US
dc.contributor.authorChiu, BCFen_US
dc.contributor.authorChan, KTY-
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-22T01:40:30Z-
dc.date.available2014-07-22T01:40:30Z-
dc.date.issued2014en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2014 WONCA Asia Pacific Regional Conference, Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia, 21-24 May 2014. In Malaysian Family Physician, 2014, v. 9 suppl. 1, p. 29-30, abstract no. OP13en_US
dc.identifier.issn1985-207X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/199825-
dc.descriptionOral presentationen_US
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The primary care setting is the entry point for most people into the health system and primary care physicians are ideally placed to serve as the central service provider for patients with depression. Unfortunately, there are many challenges identifying and managing depression in primary care and long-term outcomes and factors affecting prognosis remain unclear. To make recommendations regarding mental health policy, it is necessary to have a current knowledge of the epidemiology and outcomes of depressive disorders in patients presenting to primary care. Methods A cross-sectional followed by a longitudinal cohort study was conducted. Adult patients recruited from the waiting rooms of 59 primary care doctors completed a questionnaire which screened for depression. Doctors provided clinical information about the patient. Consenting patients were followed up by telephone at 3, 6 and 12 months. Results 10,179 subjects were recruited at baseline (response rate 81.0%). 4358 subjects entered the longitudinal study (response rate 42.8%). The cross-sectional prevalence of PHQ-screened depression was 10.69%, 12-month incidence was 6.67% and 12-month remission rate was 60.31%. Detection rate by doctors was 23.1%. Over one year, the health –related quality of life scores improved by 10% (SF-12v2 PCS) and 30% (SF-12v2 MCS). Patient-reported medication and primary care service use was increased; however, mental health service use was low. The most common patient-reported mental health service used was psychiatrists; the most common referral service used by doctors was for counselling. Conclusions Most cases of depression encountered in primary care are mild and self-limiting, but associated with significant impairment to health-related quality of life. Diagnosis of depression by a doctor does not appear to have any significant effect on resolution of symptoms and quality of life after 1 year but is associated with greater improvements in mental health-related quality of life.en_US
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAcademy of Family Physicians of Malaysia. The Journal's web site is located at http://e-mfp.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofMalaysian Family Physicianen_US
dc.subjectPrimary care-
dc.subjectEpidemiology-
dc.subjectDepression-
dc.subjectCohort-
dc.subjectHealth-related quality of life-
dc.titleFindings of a longitudinal cohort study on depressive disorders in Hong Kong’s primary careen_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChin, WY: chinwy@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, CLK: clklam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLo, YYC: yyclo@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailFong, DYT: dytfong@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLam, TP: tplam@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailLee, PWH: hrmclwh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailWong, JGWS: jgwswong@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailChan, KTY: ktychan@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChin, WY=rp00290en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, CLK=rp00350en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLo, YYC=rp00512en_US
dc.identifier.authorityFong, DYT=rp00253en_US
dc.identifier.authorityLam, TP=rp00386en_US
dc.identifier.hkuros230338en_US
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issuesuppl. 1-
dc.identifier.spage29-
dc.identifier.epage30-
dc.publisher.placeMalaysia-

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