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Article: When does FDI matter? The roles of local institutions and ethnic origins of FDI

TitleWhen does FDI matter? The roles of local institutions and ethnic origins of FDI
Authors
KeywordsChina
Emerging economies
FDI impacts
Foreign direct investment
Institutional development
Issue Date2013
PublisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ibusrev
Citation
International Business Review, 2013, v. 22 n. 2, p. 450-465 How to Cite?
AbstractHow foreign direct investment (FDI) affects a host environment is a much discussed yet less understood topic of salience for international business managers, policy makers and researchers. Using panel data from 287 Chinese cities over the period 1999-2005, our study assesses (1) the multiple impacts of FDI in both positive and negative domains, (2) the role of local institutional development in moderating these impacts, and (3) whether the moderating effects of institutions differ depending upon the origins of the incoming investment (ethnic- versus non-ethnic-linked). Our analysis shows that indeed, FDI is a double-edged sword: it enhances the host city's economic growth, labor productivity and innovation but it also causes employment reduction and pollution in host cities. Moreover, the host city's institutional development is found to enhance the positive impacts of FDI and reduce its negative ones. Interestingly, the moderating effect is smaller for ethnic-linked FDI than for non-ethnic-linked FDI. As the first comprehensive attempt to unravel the role of institutional development in moderating the ambiguous impacts of FDI in multiple domains, this study confirms that a host's ability to absorb the benefits of FDI while curtailing its associated costs is both plausible and pivotal. As our world becomes flatter and FDI more entrenched in a host's economic and social development, this study provides important implications. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169283
ISSN
2015 Impact Factor: 1.669
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.100
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWang, DTen_HK
dc.contributor.authorGu, FFen_HK
dc.contributor.authorTse, DKen_HK
dc.contributor.authorYim, CK(B)en_HK
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-18T08:48:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-18T08:48:51Z-
dc.date.issued2013en_HK
dc.identifier.citationInternational Business Review, 2013, v. 22 n. 2, p. 450-465en_HK
dc.identifier.issn0969-5931en_HK
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/169283-
dc.description.abstractHow foreign direct investment (FDI) affects a host environment is a much discussed yet less understood topic of salience for international business managers, policy makers and researchers. Using panel data from 287 Chinese cities over the period 1999-2005, our study assesses (1) the multiple impacts of FDI in both positive and negative domains, (2) the role of local institutional development in moderating these impacts, and (3) whether the moderating effects of institutions differ depending upon the origins of the incoming investment (ethnic- versus non-ethnic-linked). Our analysis shows that indeed, FDI is a double-edged sword: it enhances the host city's economic growth, labor productivity and innovation but it also causes employment reduction and pollution in host cities. Moreover, the host city's institutional development is found to enhance the positive impacts of FDI and reduce its negative ones. Interestingly, the moderating effect is smaller for ethnic-linked FDI than for non-ethnic-linked FDI. As the first comprehensive attempt to unravel the role of institutional development in moderating the ambiguous impacts of FDI in multiple domains, this study confirms that a host's ability to absorb the benefits of FDI while curtailing its associated costs is both plausible and pivotal. As our world becomes flatter and FDI more entrenched in a host's economic and social development, this study provides important implications. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.en_HK
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherPergamon. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ibusreven_HK
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Business Reviewen_HK
dc.subjectChinaen_HK
dc.subjectEmerging economiesen_HK
dc.subjectFDI impactsen_HK
dc.subjectForeign direct investmenten_HK
dc.subjectInstitutional developmenten_HK
dc.titleWhen does FDI matter? The roles of local institutions and ethnic origins of FDIen_HK
dc.typeArticleen_HK
dc.identifier.emailWang, DT: dtwang@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailTse, DK: davidtse@hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.emailYim, CK(B): yimbck@hkucc.hku.hken_HK
dc.identifier.authorityWang, DT=rp01106en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityTse, DK=rp01100en_HK
dc.identifier.authorityYim, CK(B)=rp01122en_HK
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ibusrev.2012.06.003en_HK
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84875275728en_HK
dc.identifier.hkuros211532en_US
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000316515200008-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdomen_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridWang, DT=16553709100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridGu, FF=8341699100en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridTse, DK=7101916504en_HK
dc.identifier.scopusauthoridYim, CK(B)=15770531500en_HK
dc.identifier.citeulike10867806-

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