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Article: A crucial role for dendritic cell (DC) IL-10 in inhibiting successful DC-based immunotherapy: Superior antitumor immunity against hepatocellular carcinoma evoked by DC devoid of IL-101
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TitleA crucial role for dendritic cell (DC) IL-10 in inhibiting successful DC-based immunotherapy: Superior antitumor immunity against hepatocellular carcinoma evoked by DC devoid of IL-101
 
AuthorsChen, YX1 5
Man, K1
Guang, SL1
Chen, Y1
Sun, BS1
Cheng, Q1
On, HW1
Lo, CK1
Ng, IO1
Li, CC1
Lau, GK1
Lin, CLS3
Huang, F4
Huang, FP1 3 2
 
Issue Date2007
 
PublisherAmerican Association of Immunologists. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jimmunol.org
 
CitationJournal of Immunology, 2007, v. 179 n. 9, p. 6009-6015 [How to Cite?]
 
AbstractThe dendritic cell (DC)-based tumor immunotherapy has been a new promise of cure for cancer patients, but animal studies and clinical trials have thus far only shown limited success, especially in treating established tumors. Certain immunosuppressive mechanisms triggered by tumor cells or the derivatives are believed to be a major obstacle. We studied the role of DC-derived IL-10 and its negative impact on vaccine efficacy in mouse models. Liver tumor cells were injected via the portal vein, giving rise to disseminated intrahepatic tumors, or s.c. to form solid but extrahepatic tumors. Bone marrow-derived DCs were generated from normal or IL-10-deficient mice and used as the vector to deliver tumor Ags. We demonstrate here that DCs devoid of IL-10, a potent immunosuppressive cytokine, are superior over conventional DCs in triggering antitumor immunity. The IL-10 -/-DCs were highly immunogenic, expressed enhanced levels of surface MHC class II molecules, and secreted increased amounts of Th1-related cytokines. By inducing tumor-specific killing and through the establishment of immunological memory, the vaccines delivered by IL-10 -/-DCs could evoke strong therapeutic and protective immunity against hepatocellular carcinoma in the mouse models. These findings will have great clinical impact once being translated into the treatment of malignant, and potentially infectious, diseases in humans. Copyright © 2007 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
 
ISSN0022-1767
2012 Impact Factor: 5.52
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.170
 
ISI Accession Number IDWOS:000250388000045
 
ReferencesReferences in Scopus
 
DC FieldValue
dc.contributor.authorChen, YX
 
dc.contributor.authorMan, K
 
dc.contributor.authorGuang, SL
 
dc.contributor.authorChen, Y
 
dc.contributor.authorSun, BS
 
dc.contributor.authorCheng, Q
 
dc.contributor.authorOn, HW
 
dc.contributor.authorLo, CK
 
dc.contributor.authorNg, IO
 
dc.contributor.authorLi, CC
 
dc.contributor.authorLau, GK
 
dc.contributor.authorLin, CLS
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, F
 
dc.contributor.authorHuang, FP
 
dc.date.accessioned2012-05-29T06:13:37Z
 
dc.date.available2012-05-29T06:13:37Z
 
dc.date.issued2007
 
dc.description.abstractThe dendritic cell (DC)-based tumor immunotherapy has been a new promise of cure for cancer patients, but animal studies and clinical trials have thus far only shown limited success, especially in treating established tumors. Certain immunosuppressive mechanisms triggered by tumor cells or the derivatives are believed to be a major obstacle. We studied the role of DC-derived IL-10 and its negative impact on vaccine efficacy in mouse models. Liver tumor cells were injected via the portal vein, giving rise to disseminated intrahepatic tumors, or s.c. to form solid but extrahepatic tumors. Bone marrow-derived DCs were generated from normal or IL-10-deficient mice and used as the vector to deliver tumor Ags. We demonstrate here that DCs devoid of IL-10, a potent immunosuppressive cytokine, are superior over conventional DCs in triggering antitumor immunity. The IL-10 -/-DCs were highly immunogenic, expressed enhanced levels of surface MHC class II molecules, and secreted increased amounts of Th1-related cytokines. By inducing tumor-specific killing and through the establishment of immunological memory, the vaccines delivered by IL-10 -/-DCs could evoke strong therapeutic and protective immunity against hepatocellular carcinoma in the mouse models. These findings will have great clinical impact once being translated into the treatment of malignant, and potentially infectious, diseases in humans. Copyright © 2007 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.
 
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext
 
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Immunology, 2007, v. 179 n. 9, p. 6009-6015 [How to Cite?]
 
dc.identifier.epage6015
 
dc.identifier.hkuros151259
 
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000250388000045
 
dc.identifier.issn0022-1767
2012 Impact Factor: 5.52
2012 SCImago Journal Rankings: 3.170
 
dc.identifier.issue9
 
dc.identifier.pmid17947674
 
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-38449083230
 
dc.identifier.spage6009
 
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/148542
 
dc.identifier.volume179
 
dc.languageeng
 
dc.publisherAmerican Association of Immunologists. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jimmunol.org
 
dc.publisher.placeUnited States
 
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Immunology
 
dc.relation.referencesReferences in Scopus
 
dc.subject.meshAnimals
 
dc.subject.meshCancer Vaccines
 
dc.subject.meshCarcinoma, Hepatocellular - Immunology - Pathology - Therapy
 
dc.subject.meshCell Line, Tumor
 
dc.subject.meshDendritic Cells - Immunology
 
dc.subject.meshDisease Models, Animal
 
dc.subject.meshImmunologic Memory - Immunology
 
dc.subject.meshImmunotherapy
 
dc.subject.meshInterleukin-10 - Deficiency - Genetics - Immunology - Metabolism
 
dc.subject.meshMice
 
dc.subject.meshMice, Knockout
 
dc.subject.meshNeoplasm Transplantation
 
dc.subject.meshPhenotype
 
dc.titleA crucial role for dendritic cell (DC) IL-10 in inhibiting successful DC-based immunotherapy: Superior antitumor immunity against hepatocellular carcinoma evoked by DC devoid of IL-101
 
dc.typeArticle
 
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Author Affiliations
  1. The University of Hong Kong Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine
  2. Hammersmith Hospital
  3. Imperial College London
  4. University of Cambridge
  5. Xiangya School of Medicine