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Conference Paper: Medical school culture: more positive than you think

TitleMedical school culture: more positive than you think
Authors
Issue Date2011
PublisherAMEE 2011.
Citation
The 2011 Annual Conference of the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE), Vienna, Austria, 27-31 August 2011. In Abstracts Book, 2011, p. 61, abstract 2BB13 How to Cite?
AbstractBACKGROUND: As students progress from junior to senior medical undergraduates, their development as doctors is influenced not only by the taught curriculum but also by the prevailing medical school culture which has been characterised in other studies as competitive, hierarchical and at times, abusive. This has implications on the development of the professional attitudes and behaviours expected of medical graduates. We aim to describe students’ perception of medical school culture in an Asian setting, conceptualised as the behaviours, attitudes, values and customs of the medical school and the people within it. SUMMARY OF WORK: This was a qualitative study of medical students in the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong. Between June 2010 to January 2011, students were identified through random and quota sampling and 31 participated in individual semi-structured interviews. A grounded theory approach was used to determine common themes in students’ perceptions. SUMMARY OF RESULTS: Medical school culture was categorized into peer-related, student-teacher-related, and institutional-related themes. Most of the subthemes were positive with 27% of these referring to positive peer interactions such as cooperative learning, willingness to help and provision of emotional support. CONCLUSIONS: Positive peer behaviour and attitude were perceived as the predominant features of medical school culture. TAKE-HOME MESSAGES: The role of peers in defining medical school culture is significant and may exert a powerful influence on the developing doctor.
DescriptionConference Theme: Inspire... and be inspired
Session 2BB - Posters: Career Choice/Education Environment: abstract 2BB13
Free e-book
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136751

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChen, JYen_US
dc.contributor.authorYip, AMen_US
dc.contributor.authorBeh, PSLen_US
dc.contributor.authorPatil, NGen_US
dc.date.accessioned2011-07-27T02:35:37Z-
dc.date.available2011-07-27T02:35:37Z-
dc.date.issued2011en_US
dc.identifier.citationThe 2011 Annual Conference of the Association for Medical Education in Europe (AMEE), Vienna, Austria, 27-31 August 2011. In Abstracts Book, 2011, p. 61, abstract 2BB13en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/136751-
dc.descriptionConference Theme: Inspire... and be inspired-
dc.descriptionSession 2BB - Posters: Career Choice/Education Environment: abstract 2BB13-
dc.descriptionFree e-book-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: As students progress from junior to senior medical undergraduates, their development as doctors is influenced not only by the taught curriculum but also by the prevailing medical school culture which has been characterised in other studies as competitive, hierarchical and at times, abusive. This has implications on the development of the professional attitudes and behaviours expected of medical graduates. We aim to describe students’ perception of medical school culture in an Asian setting, conceptualised as the behaviours, attitudes, values and customs of the medical school and the people within it. SUMMARY OF WORK: This was a qualitative study of medical students in the Li Ka Shing Faculty of Medicine, University of Hong Kong. Between June 2010 to January 2011, students were identified through random and quota sampling and 31 participated in individual semi-structured interviews. A grounded theory approach was used to determine common themes in students’ perceptions. SUMMARY OF RESULTS: Medical school culture was categorized into peer-related, student-teacher-related, and institutional-related themes. Most of the subthemes were positive with 27% of these referring to positive peer interactions such as cooperative learning, willingness to help and provision of emotional support. CONCLUSIONS: Positive peer behaviour and attitude were perceived as the predominant features of medical school culture. TAKE-HOME MESSAGES: The role of peers in defining medical school culture is significant and may exert a powerful influence on the developing doctor.-
dc.languageengen_US
dc.publisherAMEE 2011.-
dc.relation.ispartofAnnual Conference of the Association for Medical Education in Europe, AMEE 2011en_US
dc.titleMedical school culture: more positive than you thinken_US
dc.typeConference_Paperen_US
dc.identifier.emailChen, JY: chenjy@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailYip, AM: amberyip@hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailBeh, PSL: slbeh@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.emailPatil, NG: ngpatil@hkucc.hku.hken_US
dc.identifier.authorityChen, JY=rp00526en_US
dc.identifier.authorityBeh, PSL=rp00409en_US
dc.identifier.authorityPatil, NG=rp00388en_US
dc.description.naturelink_to_OA_fulltext-
dc.identifier.hkuros186482en_US
dc.identifier.spage61, abstract 2BB13-
dc.identifier.epage61, abstract 2BB13-
dc.publisher.placeAustria-

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