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Article: Antidepressant-like effects of transcorneal electrical stimulation in rat models

TitleAntidepressant-like effects of transcorneal electrical stimulation in rat models
Authors
Issue Date2022
PublisherElsevier. The Journal's web site is located at http://brainstimjrnl.com
Citation
Brain Stimulation, How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Given that visual impairment is bi-directionally associated with depression, we decided to examine whether transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES), a non-invasive treatment for visual disorders, can ameliorate depressive symptoms. Objective: The putative antidepressant-like effects of TES and the underlying mechanisms were investigated in an S334ter-line-3 rat model of retinal degeneration and a rat model of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Methods: TES was administered daily for 1 week in S334ter-line-3 and CUS rats. The effects of TES on behavioral parameters, plasma corticosterone levels, and different aspects of neuroplasticity, including neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and apoptosis, were examined. Results: In the S334ter-line-3 rats, TES induced anxiolytic and antidepressant-like behaviors in the cylinder, open field, home cage emergence, and forced swim tests. In the CUS rat model, TES induced hedonic-like behavior and decreased behavioral despair, which were accompanied by reduced plasma corticosterone levels and upregulated expression of neurogenesis-related genes. Treatment with the neurogenesis blocker TMZ only inhibited the hedonic-like effects of TES, suggesting the antidepressant-like effects of TES were mediated through both neurogenesis-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Furthermore, TES was found to normalize the protein expression of synaptic markers and apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein in the hippocampus and amygdala in the CUS rat model. The improvements in neuroplasticity may involve protein kinase B (AKT) and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathways in the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively, as demonstrated by the altered pAKT/AKT and pPKA/PKA ratios. Conclusion: The overall findings suggest a possible neuroplasticity mechanism of the antidepressant-like effects of TES.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/313204

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYU, WS-
dc.contributor.authorTse, CKA-
dc.contributor.authorGuan, L-
dc.contributor.authorChiu, JLY-
dc.contributor.authorTAN, ZKS-
dc.contributor.authorMUHAMMAD SHARAFUDDIN BIN, MK-
dc.contributor.authorAgadagba, SK-
dc.contributor.authorLo, ACY-
dc.contributor.authorFung, ML-
dc.contributor.authorChan, YS-
dc.contributor.authorChan, LLH-
dc.contributor.authorLim, LW-
dc.date.accessioned2022-06-06T05:47:34Z-
dc.date.available2022-06-06T05:47:34Z-
dc.date.issued2022-
dc.identifier.citationBrain Stimulation,-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/313204-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Given that visual impairment is bi-directionally associated with depression, we decided to examine whether transcorneal electrical stimulation (TES), a non-invasive treatment for visual disorders, can ameliorate depressive symptoms. Objective: The putative antidepressant-like effects of TES and the underlying mechanisms were investigated in an S334ter-line-3 rat model of retinal degeneration and a rat model of chronic unpredictable stress (CUS). Methods: TES was administered daily for 1 week in S334ter-line-3 and CUS rats. The effects of TES on behavioral parameters, plasma corticosterone levels, and different aspects of neuroplasticity, including neurogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and apoptosis, were examined. Results: In the S334ter-line-3 rats, TES induced anxiolytic and antidepressant-like behaviors in the cylinder, open field, home cage emergence, and forced swim tests. In the CUS rat model, TES induced hedonic-like behavior and decreased behavioral despair, which were accompanied by reduced plasma corticosterone levels and upregulated expression of neurogenesis-related genes. Treatment with the neurogenesis blocker TMZ only inhibited the hedonic-like effects of TES, suggesting the antidepressant-like effects of TES were mediated through both neurogenesis-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Furthermore, TES was found to normalize the protein expression of synaptic markers and apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein in the hippocampus and amygdala in the CUS rat model. The improvements in neuroplasticity may involve protein kinase B (AKT) and protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathways in the hippocampus and amygdala, respectively, as demonstrated by the altered pAKT/AKT and pPKA/PKA ratios. Conclusion: The overall findings suggest a possible neuroplasticity mechanism of the antidepressant-like effects of TES.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier. The Journal's web site is located at http://brainstimjrnl.com-
dc.relation.ispartofBrain Stimulation-
dc.titleAntidepressant-like effects of transcorneal electrical stimulation in rat models-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTse, CKA: annatse@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLo, ACY: amylo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFung, ML: fungml@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, YS: yschan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLim, LW: limlw@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLo, ACY=rp00425-
dc.identifier.authorityFung, ML=rp00433-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, YS=rp00318-
dc.identifier.authorityLim, LW=rp02088-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.brs.2022.05.018-
dc.identifier.hkuros333267-

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