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Article: Superficial Needling Acupuncture vs Sham Acupuncture for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial

TitleSuperficial Needling Acupuncture vs Sham Acupuncture for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial
Authors
KeywordsAcupuncture
knee osteoarthritis
randomized controlled trial
sham control
Issue Date2021
PublisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.amjmed.com/
Citation
The American Journal of Medicine, 2021, v. 134 n. 10, p. 1286-1294.e2 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Acupuncture has been an alternative approach for pain management, but trial evidence is conflicting. Methods: Eighty-six patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio from June 14, 2017, to January 20, 2019, to receive either superficial needling acupuncture treatment or sham acupuncture for 10 sessions over a 4-week treatment period, followed by a 6-week follow-up period. The primary outcome was the change of pain intensity at week 4 measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Secondary outcomes included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Results: At the end of the 4-week treatment period, mean changes in the visual analogue scale were −30.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], −38.2 to −23.0; p <.001) in the acupuncture group and −26.7 (95% CI, −34.4 to −18.8; P <.001) in the sham group. The difference between the acupuncture group and the sham group was −4.1 (95% CI, −14.4 to 6.2; P = 0.431). At week 10, the difference between the groups was −2.2 (95% CI, −13.1 to 8.8; P =0.699). There was no statistically significant difference in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscores (pain, stiffness, and physical function) and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey-related outcomes across groups from weeks 2 to 10. The incidence of treatment-related adverse events was 4.4% in the acupuncture group and 0.8% in the sham acupuncture group. All adverse events were classified as mild. Conclusion: Acupuncture for 4 weeks is not superior to non-penetrating sham acupuncture. The current study cannot confirm that superficial acupuncture has efficacy for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/306800
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.965
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.132
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLam, WC-
dc.contributor.authorAu, KY-
dc.contributor.authorQIN, Z-
dc.contributor.authorWu, FM-
dc.contributor.authorChong, CO-
dc.contributor.authorJiang, F-
dc.contributor.authorHe, Y-
dc.contributor.authorNg, BFL-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, WF-
dc.contributor.authorLao, L-
dc.contributor.authorChen, H-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-22T07:39:46Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-22T07:39:46Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationThe American Journal of Medicine, 2021, v. 134 n. 10, p. 1286-1294.e2-
dc.identifier.issn0002-9343-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/306800-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Acupuncture has been an alternative approach for pain management, but trial evidence is conflicting. Methods: Eighty-six patients with knee osteoarthritis were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio from June 14, 2017, to January 20, 2019, to receive either superficial needling acupuncture treatment or sham acupuncture for 10 sessions over a 4-week treatment period, followed by a 6-week follow-up period. The primary outcome was the change of pain intensity at week 4 measured using a 100-mm visual analogue scale. Secondary outcomes included the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey. Results: At the end of the 4-week treatment period, mean changes in the visual analogue scale were −30.8 (95% confidence interval [CI], −38.2 to −23.0; p <.001) in the acupuncture group and −26.7 (95% CI, −34.4 to −18.8; P <.001) in the sham group. The difference between the acupuncture group and the sham group was −4.1 (95% CI, −14.4 to 6.2; P = 0.431). At week 10, the difference between the groups was −2.2 (95% CI, −13.1 to 8.8; P =0.699). There was no statistically significant difference in Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index subscores (pain, stiffness, and physical function) and 36-Item Short Form Health Survey-related outcomes across groups from weeks 2 to 10. The incidence of treatment-related adverse events was 4.4% in the acupuncture group and 0.8% in the sham acupuncture group. All adverse events were classified as mild. Conclusion: Acupuncture for 4 weeks is not superior to non-penetrating sham acupuncture. The current study cannot confirm that superficial acupuncture has efficacy for the treatment of knee osteoarthritis.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.amjmed.com/-
dc.relation.ispartofThe American Journal of Medicine-
dc.subjectAcupuncture-
dc.subjectknee osteoarthritis-
dc.subjectrandomized controlled trial-
dc.subjectsham control-
dc.titleSuperficial Needling Acupuncture vs Sham Acupuncture for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChen, H: haiyong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, H=rp01923-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.amjmed.2021.05.002-
dc.identifier.pmid34126097-
dc.identifier.hkuros328869-
dc.identifier.volume134-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spage1286-
dc.identifier.epage1294.e2-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000704398400044-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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