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Article: The prevalence of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) with or without erosive etiological factors among adults of different ages in Tokyo

TitleThe prevalence of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) with or without erosive etiological factors among adults of different ages in Tokyo
Authors
KeywordsNon-carious cervical lesions
Erosion
Tooth wear
Prevalence
Risk factors
Issue Date2021
PublisherSpringer for German Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00784/index.htm
Citation
Clinical Oral Investigations, 2021, v. 25 n. 12, p. 6939-6947 How to Cite?
AbstractObjectives: To evaluate the prevalence of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) on teeth with or without erosive etiological factors across a broad range of ages of Japanese adults. Materials and methods: The study sample consisted of a total of 1108 subjects aged 15 to 89 years in Tokyo, Japan. Two examiners evaluated NCCLs and dental erosion (DE) during a full-mouth examination. Subjects were asked to complete a self-administered daily diet, habits, and health condition questionnaire. Subjects who had frequent acid consumption or gastric reflux and at least one tooth with initial enamel wear were placed in the erosion present (EP) group, and the remainder of subjects were placed in the erosion not present (EN) group. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify etiological factors of NCCLs associated with DE. Results: Overall prevalence of NCCLs was 60.2%; the prevalence increased with age. There were no statistical differences in the prevalence of NCCLs between the EP and EN groups, except for the 60–69 years group. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed the frequency of consumption of carbonated soft drinks, citrus juice, and acidic fruits such as oranges; tooth brushing pressure; and bruxism were associated with the presence of NCCLs. Conclusion: There were no statistical differences in the prevalence of NCCLs with or without erosive etiological factors except for the 60–69 years group. Clinical relevance: NCCL distribution increased with age, and erosive risk factors caused by change in dietary habits might affect the incidence of NCCLs for elders. Trial registration: UMIN000041982
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/306470
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.573
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.088
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorKitasako, Y-
dc.contributor.authorIkeda, M-
dc.contributor.authorTakagaki, T-
dc.contributor.authorBurrow, MF-
dc.contributor.authorTagami, J-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-22T07:35:04Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-22T07:35:04Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Oral Investigations, 2021, v. 25 n. 12, p. 6939-6947-
dc.identifier.issn1432-6981-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/306470-
dc.description.abstractObjectives: To evaluate the prevalence of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) on teeth with or without erosive etiological factors across a broad range of ages of Japanese adults. Materials and methods: The study sample consisted of a total of 1108 subjects aged 15 to 89 years in Tokyo, Japan. Two examiners evaluated NCCLs and dental erosion (DE) during a full-mouth examination. Subjects were asked to complete a self-administered daily diet, habits, and health condition questionnaire. Subjects who had frequent acid consumption or gastric reflux and at least one tooth with initial enamel wear were placed in the erosion present (EP) group, and the remainder of subjects were placed in the erosion not present (EN) group. Logistic regression analyses were carried out to identify etiological factors of NCCLs associated with DE. Results: Overall prevalence of NCCLs was 60.2%; the prevalence increased with age. There were no statistical differences in the prevalence of NCCLs between the EP and EN groups, except for the 60–69 years group. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed the frequency of consumption of carbonated soft drinks, citrus juice, and acidic fruits such as oranges; tooth brushing pressure; and bruxism were associated with the presence of NCCLs. Conclusion: There were no statistical differences in the prevalence of NCCLs with or without erosive etiological factors except for the 60–69 years group. Clinical relevance: NCCL distribution increased with age, and erosive risk factors caused by change in dietary habits might affect the incidence of NCCLs for elders. Trial registration: UMIN000041982-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringer for German Society of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.de/link/service/journals/00784/index.htm-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Oral Investigations-
dc.subjectNon-carious cervical lesions-
dc.subjectErosion-
dc.subjectTooth wear-
dc.subjectPrevalence-
dc.subjectRisk factors-
dc.titleThe prevalence of non-carious cervical lesions (NCCLs) with or without erosive etiological factors among adults of different ages in Tokyo-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailBurrow, MF: mfburr58@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityBurrow, MF=rp01306-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00784-021-03984-8-
dc.identifier.pmid34031732-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85106401202-
dc.identifier.hkuros328967-
dc.identifier.volume25-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spage6939-
dc.identifier.epage6947-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000653588600001-
dc.publisher.placeGermany-

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