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Article: Saliva viral load better correlates with clinical and immunological profiles in children with coronavirus disease 2019

TitleSaliva viral load better correlates with clinical and immunological profiles in children with coronavirus disease 2019
Authors
KeywordsCOVID-19
children
saliva
immunological profiles
viral load
Issue Date2021
PublisherTaylor & Francis, published in association with Shanghai Shangyixun Cultural Communication Company. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/temi20/current
Citation
Emerging Microbes & Infections, 2021, v. 10 n. 1, p. 235-241 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Pediatric COVID-19 studies exploring the relationships between NPS and saliva viral loads, clinical and immunological profiles are lacking. Methods: Demographics, immunological profiles, nasopharyngeal swab (NPS), and saliva samples collected on admission, and hospital length of stay (LOS) were assessed in children below 18 years with COVID-19. Findings: 91 patients were included between March and August 20 20. NPS and saliva viral loads were correlated (r = 0.315, p = 0.01). Symptomatic patients had significantly higher NPS and saliva viral loads than asymptomatic patients. Serial NPS and saliva viral load measurements showed that the log10 NPS (r = −0.532, p < 0.001) and saliva (r = −0.417, p < 0.001) viral loads for all patients were inversely correlated with the days from symptom onset with statistical significance. Patients with cough, sputum, and headache had significantly higher saliva, but not NPS, viral loads. Higher saliva, but not NPS, viral loads were associated with total lymphopenia, CD3 and CD4 lymphopenia (all p < 0.05), and were inversely correlated with total lymphocyte (r = −0.43), CD3 (r = −0.55), CD4 (r = −0.60), CD8 (r = −0.41), B (r = −0.482), and NK (r = −0.416) lymphocyte counts (all p < 0.05). Interpretation: Saliva viral loads on admission in children correlated better with clinical and immunological profiles than NPS.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304726
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 6.212
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.475
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChua, GT-
dc.contributor.authorWong, JSC-
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKW-
dc.contributor.authorLam, ICS-
dc.contributor.authorYau, FYS-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WH-
dc.contributor.authorHo, PPK-
dc.contributor.authorSou Da Rosa Duque, J-
dc.contributor.authorYip, CCY-
dc.contributor.authorNg, ACK-
dc.contributor.authorWong, WHS-
dc.contributor.authorKwong, JHY-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, KFS-
dc.contributor.authorWan, PT-
dc.contributor.authorLam, K-
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICK-
dc.contributor.authorKwok, J-
dc.contributor.authorHo, MHK-
dc.contributor.authorChan, GCF-
dc.contributor.authorLau, YL-
dc.contributor.authorIp, P-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, MYW-
dc.date.accessioned2021-10-05T02:34:17Z-
dc.date.available2021-10-05T02:34:17Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Microbes & Infections, 2021, v. 10 n. 1, p. 235-241-
dc.identifier.issn2222-1751-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/304726-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Pediatric COVID-19 studies exploring the relationships between NPS and saliva viral loads, clinical and immunological profiles are lacking. Methods: Demographics, immunological profiles, nasopharyngeal swab (NPS), and saliva samples collected on admission, and hospital length of stay (LOS) were assessed in children below 18 years with COVID-19. Findings: 91 patients were included between March and August 20 20. NPS and saliva viral loads were correlated (r = 0.315, p = 0.01). Symptomatic patients had significantly higher NPS and saliva viral loads than asymptomatic patients. Serial NPS and saliva viral load measurements showed that the log10 NPS (r = −0.532, p < 0.001) and saliva (r = −0.417, p < 0.001) viral loads for all patients were inversely correlated with the days from symptom onset with statistical significance. Patients with cough, sputum, and headache had significantly higher saliva, but not NPS, viral loads. Higher saliva, but not NPS, viral loads were associated with total lymphopenia, CD3 and CD4 lymphopenia (all p < 0.05), and were inversely correlated with total lymphocyte (r = −0.43), CD3 (r = −0.55), CD4 (r = −0.60), CD8 (r = −0.41), B (r = −0.482), and NK (r = −0.416) lymphocyte counts (all p < 0.05). Interpretation: Saliva viral loads on admission in children correlated better with clinical and immunological profiles than NPS.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis, published in association with Shanghai Shangyixun Cultural Communication Company. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/temi20/current-
dc.relation.ispartofEmerging Microbes & Infections-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectCOVID-19-
dc.subjectchildren-
dc.subjectsaliva-
dc.subjectimmunological profiles-
dc.subjectviral load-
dc.titleSaliva viral load better correlates with clinical and immunological profiles in children with coronavirus disease 2019-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChua, GT: cgt560@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTo, KKW: kelvinto@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSou Da Rosa Duque, J: jsrduque@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYip, CCY: yipcyril@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, WHS: whswong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKwok, J: kwoksy@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, MHK: marcoho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, GCF: gcfchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, P: patricip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChua, GT=rp02684-
dc.identifier.authorityTo, KKW=rp01384-
dc.identifier.authoritySou Da Rosa Duque, J=rp02340-
dc.identifier.authorityYip, CCY=rp01721-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, GCF=rp00431-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, P=rp01337-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/22221751.2021.1878937-
dc.identifier.pmid33467982-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7899683-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85101275790-
dc.identifier.hkuros326308-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage235-
dc.identifier.epage241-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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