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Article: Psychological Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Licensed Full-Time Practicing Nurses Undertaking Part-Time Studies in Higher Education: A Cross-Sectional Study

TitlePsychological Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Licensed Full-Time Practicing Nurses Undertaking Part-Time Studies in Higher Education: A Cross-Sectional Study
Authors
KeywordsCOVID-19 pandemic
licensed full-time practicing nurses
part-time studies in higher education
GAD-7
PHQ-2
Issue Date2021
PublisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerph
Citation
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2021, v. 18 n. 16, p. article no. 8569 How to Cite?
AbstractFrontline nurses face an unpreceded situation with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, and many report suffering from physical and psychological stress. This online, cross-sectional survey used questionnaires, such as the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2), the Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale, stress-related questions, and Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (Brief-COPE), to determine the psychological impact of COVID-19 on licensed full-time practicing nurses undertaking part-time studies in higher education. Recruitment commenced from August to September 2020; 385 students were approached, and 124 completed the survey (response rate: 32%). Most of the respondents were frontline nurses working in public sectors (89.5%), 29% of whom reported symptoms of depression, and 61.3% reported mild to severe levels of anxiety. The GAD-7 was significantly associated with the resilience score (β = −0.188; p = 0.008) and exhaustion (β = 0.612; p < 0.001). The PHQ-2 was significantly associated with ‘anxiety about infection’ (β = 0.071; p = 0.048). A lower anxiety level was significantly associated with a higher resilience level and a lower level of exhaustion, and a lower depression level was significantly associated with a lower anxiety about infection. Nursing programs incorporating resilience building may mitigate psychological distress of the study population.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/302412
ISBN
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 2.849
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.747
PubMed Central ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChan, SL-
dc.contributor.authorTakemura, N-
dc.contributor.authorChau, PH-
dc.contributor.authorLin, CC-
dc.contributor.authorWang, MP-
dc.date.accessioned2021-09-06T03:31:55Z-
dc.date.available2021-09-06T03:31:55Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2021, v. 18 n. 16, p. article no. 8569-
dc.identifier.isbn9783039437146-
dc.identifier.issn1661-7827-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/302412-
dc.description.abstractFrontline nurses face an unpreceded situation with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic, and many report suffering from physical and psychological stress. This online, cross-sectional survey used questionnaires, such as the Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD-7) questionnaire, the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-2), the Connor–Davidson Resilience Scale, stress-related questions, and Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (Brief-COPE), to determine the psychological impact of COVID-19 on licensed full-time practicing nurses undertaking part-time studies in higher education. Recruitment commenced from August to September 2020; 385 students were approached, and 124 completed the survey (response rate: 32%). Most of the respondents were frontline nurses working in public sectors (89.5%), 29% of whom reported symptoms of depression, and 61.3% reported mild to severe levels of anxiety. The GAD-7 was significantly associated with the resilience score (β = −0.188; p = 0.008) and exhaustion (β = 0.612; p < 0.001). The PHQ-2 was significantly associated with ‘anxiety about infection’ (β = 0.071; p = 0.048). A lower anxiety level was significantly associated with a higher resilience level and a lower level of exhaustion, and a lower depression level was significantly associated with a lower anxiety about infection. Nursing programs incorporating resilience building may mitigate psychological distress of the study population.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMolecular Diversity Preservation International. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.org/ijerph-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectCOVID-19 pandemic-
dc.subjectlicensed full-time practicing nurses-
dc.subjectpart-time studies in higher education-
dc.subjectGAD-7-
dc.subjectPHQ-2-
dc.titlePsychological Impact of the COVID-19 Pandemic on Licensed Full-Time Practicing Nurses Undertaking Part-Time Studies in Higher Education: A Cross-Sectional Study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, SL: pollycha@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChau, PH: phpchau@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLin, CC: lincc@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWang, MP: mpwang@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, SL=rp00242-
dc.identifier.authorityChau, PH=rp00574-
dc.identifier.authorityLin, CC=rp02265-
dc.identifier.authorityWang, MP=rp01863-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph18168569-
dc.identifier.pmid34444322-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC8391214-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85112284840-
dc.identifier.hkuros324631-
dc.identifier.volume18-
dc.identifier.issue16-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 8569-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 8569-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-

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