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Article: The associations between ambient air pollution and adult respiratory mortality in 32 major Chinese cities, 2006-2010

TitleThe associations between ambient air pollution and adult respiratory mortality in 32 major Chinese cities, 2006-2010
Authors
KeywordsRespiratory mortality
PM 10
Air pollution index
China
Air pollution
Issue Date2015
Citation
Environmental Research, 2015, v. 137, p. 278-286 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: China has experienced increasingly severe levels of air pollution in the past decades, yet studies on the health effects of air pollution in China at a national study level, remain limited. This study assess the sub-chronic effect of ambient air pollution on respiratory mortality in the 32 largest Chinese cities. Methods: We employ two-way fixed effects panel data analysis and monthly air pollution and mortality panel data. We estimate associations between monthly respiratory mortality and air pollution; pollution is defined as particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <10. μm. We adjust for city characteristics, seasonality (monthly effects), and weather conditions (precipitation and temperature). We examine the associations between monthly injury mortality and air pollution to check for robustness. Results: The results show positive and statistically significant associations of air pollution with respiratory mortality. During the study period (2006-2010) a 10μg/m3 increase in monthly PM10 concentration is associated with a 1.05% (95% CI, 0.08-2.04%) increase in adult respiratory mortality rate. The air pollution effect is the most salient in northern cities (with central heating system) during the cold season (October-April); a 10μg/m3 increase in monthly PM10 concentrations is associated with a 1.62% (95% CI, 0.22-3.46%) increase in the elderly respiratory mortality rate. There is no statistically significant association between the young adult respiratory mortality and air pollution. Conclusions: The elderly respiratory mortality rate in China is positively and statistically significantly associated with air pollution. The effect is largest in northern cities during cold months when coal is burned for heating.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/302174
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 6.498
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.460
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhou, Maigeng-
dc.contributor.authorHe, Guojun-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Yunning-
dc.contributor.authorYin, Peng-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Yichong-
dc.contributor.authorKan, Haidong-
dc.contributor.authorFan, Maorong-
dc.contributor.authorXue, An-
dc.contributor.authorFan, Maoyong-
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-30T13:57:57Z-
dc.date.available2021-08-30T13:57:57Z-
dc.date.issued2015-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironmental Research, 2015, v. 137, p. 278-286-
dc.identifier.issn0013-9351-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/302174-
dc.description.abstractBackground: China has experienced increasingly severe levels of air pollution in the past decades, yet studies on the health effects of air pollution in China at a national study level, remain limited. This study assess the sub-chronic effect of ambient air pollution on respiratory mortality in the 32 largest Chinese cities. Methods: We employ two-way fixed effects panel data analysis and monthly air pollution and mortality panel data. We estimate associations between monthly respiratory mortality and air pollution; pollution is defined as particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter <10. μm. We adjust for city characteristics, seasonality (monthly effects), and weather conditions (precipitation and temperature). We examine the associations between monthly injury mortality and air pollution to check for robustness. Results: The results show positive and statistically significant associations of air pollution with respiratory mortality. During the study period (2006-2010) a 10μg/m3 increase in monthly PM10 concentration is associated with a 1.05% (95% CI, 0.08-2.04%) increase in adult respiratory mortality rate. The air pollution effect is the most salient in northern cities (with central heating system) during the cold season (October-April); a 10μg/m3 increase in monthly PM10 concentrations is associated with a 1.62% (95% CI, 0.22-3.46%) increase in the elderly respiratory mortality rate. There is no statistically significant association between the young adult respiratory mortality and air pollution. Conclusions: The elderly respiratory mortality rate in China is positively and statistically significantly associated with air pollution. The effect is largest in northern cities during cold months when coal is burned for heating.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironmental Research-
dc.subjectRespiratory mortality-
dc.subjectPM 10-
dc.subjectAir pollution index-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.subjectAir pollution-
dc.titleThe associations between ambient air pollution and adult respiratory mortality in 32 major Chinese cities, 2006-2010-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.envres.2014.12.016-
dc.identifier.pmid25601729-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84922567384-
dc.identifier.volume137-
dc.identifier.spage278-
dc.identifier.epage286-
dc.identifier.eissn1096-0953-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000352331000033-

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