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Article: Dietary potato intake and risks of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes mellitus

TitleDietary potato intake and risks of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes mellitus
Authors
KeywordsPotato intake
Type 2 diabetes
Gestational diabetes mellitus
Meta-analysis
Issue Date2021
PublisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/clnu
Citation
Clinical Nutrition, 2021, v. 40 n. 6, p. 3754-3764 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground & aims: Evidence regarding associations between potato consumption and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) risks is accumulating. This study aims to synthesize the evidence by conducting a meta-analysis of available studies. Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched (up to August 2020) to retrieve all eligible studies on the associations of interest. The risk estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were summarized using random- or fixed-effects model based on heterogeneity. Meta-analyses were performed for East and West regions separately. Dose–response relationship was assessed using data from all intake categories in each study. Results: A total of 19 studies (13 for T2D; 6 for GDM) were identified, including 21,357 T2D cases among 323,475 participants and 1516 GDM cases among 29,288 pregnancies. Meta-analysis detected a significantly positive association with T2D risk for total potato (RR: 1.19 [1.06, 1.34]), baked/boiled/mashed potato (RR: 1.08 [1.00, 1.16]), and French fries/fried potato (RR: 1.33 [1.03, 1.70]) intakes among Western populations. Dose–response meta-analysis demonstrated a significantly increased T2D risk by 10% (95% CI: 1.07, 1.14; P for trend<0.001), 2% (95% CI: 1.00, 1.04; P for trend = 0.02) and 34% (95% CI: 1.24, 1.46; P for trend<0.001) for each 80 g/day (serving) increment in total potato, unfried potato, and fried potato intakes, respectively. As for GDM, summarized estimates also suggested a higher though non-significant GDM risk for total potato (RR: 1.19 [0.89, 1.58]), and French fries/fried potato (RR: 1.03 [0.97, 1.09]) intakes in Western countries. In the dose–response meta-analysis, a significantly increased GDM risk was revealed for each daily serving (80 g) intakes of total potato (RR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.42; P for trend = 0.007) and unfried potato (RR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.48; P for trend = 0.006). Conclusions: This study suggests that higher potato intake is associated with higher T2D risk among Western populations. The positive relationship presents a significant dose–response manner. Wisely controlled potato consumption may confer potential glucometabolic benefits.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/301719
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 7.324
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.915

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGUO, F-
dc.contributor.authorZhang, Q-
dc.contributor.authorJiang, H-
dc.contributor.authorHe, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLi, M-
dc.contributor.authorRAN, J-
dc.contributor.authorLin, J-
dc.contributor.authorTian, L-
dc.contributor.authorMa, L-
dc.date.accessioned2021-08-09T03:43:13Z-
dc.date.available2021-08-09T03:43:13Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationClinical Nutrition, 2021, v. 40 n. 6, p. 3754-3764-
dc.identifier.issn0261-5614-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/301719-
dc.description.abstractBackground & aims: Evidence regarding associations between potato consumption and type 2 diabetes (T2D) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) risks is accumulating. This study aims to synthesize the evidence by conducting a meta-analysis of available studies. Methods: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE and Cochrane Library were searched (up to August 2020) to retrieve all eligible studies on the associations of interest. The risk estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were summarized using random- or fixed-effects model based on heterogeneity. Meta-analyses were performed for East and West regions separately. Dose–response relationship was assessed using data from all intake categories in each study. Results: A total of 19 studies (13 for T2D; 6 for GDM) were identified, including 21,357 T2D cases among 323,475 participants and 1516 GDM cases among 29,288 pregnancies. Meta-analysis detected a significantly positive association with T2D risk for total potato (RR: 1.19 [1.06, 1.34]), baked/boiled/mashed potato (RR: 1.08 [1.00, 1.16]), and French fries/fried potato (RR: 1.33 [1.03, 1.70]) intakes among Western populations. Dose–response meta-analysis demonstrated a significantly increased T2D risk by 10% (95% CI: 1.07, 1.14; P for trend<0.001), 2% (95% CI: 1.00, 1.04; P for trend = 0.02) and 34% (95% CI: 1.24, 1.46; P for trend<0.001) for each 80 g/day (serving) increment in total potato, unfried potato, and fried potato intakes, respectively. As for GDM, summarized estimates also suggested a higher though non-significant GDM risk for total potato (RR: 1.19 [0.89, 1.58]), and French fries/fried potato (RR: 1.03 [0.97, 1.09]) intakes in Western countries. In the dose–response meta-analysis, a significantly increased GDM risk was revealed for each daily serving (80 g) intakes of total potato (RR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.06, 1.42; P for trend = 0.007) and unfried potato (RR: 1.26; 95% CI: 1.07, 1.48; P for trend = 0.006). Conclusions: This study suggests that higher potato intake is associated with higher T2D risk among Western populations. The positive relationship presents a significant dose–response manner. Wisely controlled potato consumption may confer potential glucometabolic benefits.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier BV. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/clnu-
dc.relation.ispartofClinical Nutrition-
dc.subjectPotato intake-
dc.subjectType 2 diabetes-
dc.subjectGestational diabetes mellitus-
dc.subjectMeta-analysis-
dc.titleDietary potato intake and risks of type 2 diabetes and gestational diabetes mellitus-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTian, L: linweit@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTian, L=rp01991-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.clnu.2021.04.039-
dc.identifier.pmid34130021-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85107737601-
dc.identifier.hkuros323838-
dc.identifier.volume40-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spage3754-
dc.identifier.epage3764-
dc.publisher.placeNetherlands-

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