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Article: RICE ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 affects acyl-CoA homeostasis and growth in rice

TitleRICE ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 affects acyl-CoA homeostasis and growth in rice
Authors
KeywordsAcyl-CoA esters
Acyl-CoA-binding protein
Jasmonic acid
Lipid metabolism
Peroxidases
Issue Date2020
PublisherSpringerOpen. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.com/journal/12284
Citation
Rice, 2020, v. 13 n. 1, p. article no. 75 How to Cite?
AbstractBackgrounds: Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters are important intermediates in lipid metabolism with regulatory properties. Acyl-CoA-binding proteins bind and transport acyl-CoAs to fulfill these functions. RICE ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 (OsACBP6) is currently the only one peroxisome-localized plant ACBP that has been proposed to be involved in β-oxidation in transgenic Arabidopsis. The role of the peroxisomal ACBP (OsACBP6) in rice (Oryza sativa) was investigated. Results: Here, we report on the function of OsACBP6 in rice. The osacbp6 mutant showed diminished growth with reduction in root meristem activity and leaf growth. Acyl-CoA profiling and lipidomic analysis revealed an increase in acyl-CoA content and a slight triacylglycerol accumulation caused by the loss of OsACBP6. Comparative transcriptomic analysis discerned the biological processes arising from the loss of OsACBP6. Reduced response to oxidative stress was represented by a decline in gene expression of a group of peroxidases and peroxidase activities. An elevation in hydrogen peroxide was observed in both roots and shoots/leaves of osacbp6. Taken together, loss of OsACBP6 not only resulted in a disruption of the acyl-CoA homeostasis but also peroxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis. In contrast, osacbp6-complemented transgenic rice displayed similar phenotype to the wild type rice, supporting a role for OsACBP6 in the maintenance of the acyl-CoA pool and ROS homeostasis. Furthermore, quantification of plant hormones supported the findings observed in the transcriptome and an increase in jasmonic acid level occurred in osacbp6. Conclusions: In summary, OsACBP6 appears to be required for the efficient utilization of acyl-CoAs. Disruption of OsACBP6 compromises growth and led to provoked defense response, suggesting a correlation of enhanced acyl-CoAs content with defense responses.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/299130
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.783
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.562
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMeng, W-
dc.contributor.authorXu, L-
dc.contributor.authorDu, ZY-
dc.contributor.authorWang, F-
dc.contributor.authorZHANG, R-
dc.contributor.authorSong, X-
dc.contributor.authorLam, SM-
dc.contributor.authorShui, G-
dc.contributor.authorLi, Y-
dc.contributor.authorChye, ML-
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-28T02:26:35Z-
dc.date.available2021-04-28T02:26:35Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationRice, 2020, v. 13 n. 1, p. article no. 75-
dc.identifier.issn1939-8425-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/299130-
dc.description.abstractBackgrounds: Acyl-coenzyme A (CoA) esters are important intermediates in lipid metabolism with regulatory properties. Acyl-CoA-binding proteins bind and transport acyl-CoAs to fulfill these functions. RICE ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 (OsACBP6) is currently the only one peroxisome-localized plant ACBP that has been proposed to be involved in β-oxidation in transgenic Arabidopsis. The role of the peroxisomal ACBP (OsACBP6) in rice (Oryza sativa) was investigated. Results: Here, we report on the function of OsACBP6 in rice. The osacbp6 mutant showed diminished growth with reduction in root meristem activity and leaf growth. Acyl-CoA profiling and lipidomic analysis revealed an increase in acyl-CoA content and a slight triacylglycerol accumulation caused by the loss of OsACBP6. Comparative transcriptomic analysis discerned the biological processes arising from the loss of OsACBP6. Reduced response to oxidative stress was represented by a decline in gene expression of a group of peroxidases and peroxidase activities. An elevation in hydrogen peroxide was observed in both roots and shoots/leaves of osacbp6. Taken together, loss of OsACBP6 not only resulted in a disruption of the acyl-CoA homeostasis but also peroxidase-dependent reactive oxygen species (ROS) homeostasis. In contrast, osacbp6-complemented transgenic rice displayed similar phenotype to the wild type rice, supporting a role for OsACBP6 in the maintenance of the acyl-CoA pool and ROS homeostasis. Furthermore, quantification of plant hormones supported the findings observed in the transcriptome and an increase in jasmonic acid level occurred in osacbp6. Conclusions: In summary, OsACBP6 appears to be required for the efficient utilization of acyl-CoAs. Disruption of OsACBP6 compromises growth and led to provoked defense response, suggesting a correlation of enhanced acyl-CoAs content with defense responses.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSpringerOpen. The Journal's web site is located at http://link.springer.com/journal/12284-
dc.relation.ispartofRice-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectAcyl-CoA esters-
dc.subjectAcyl-CoA-binding protein-
dc.subjectJasmonic acid-
dc.subjectLipid metabolism-
dc.subjectPeroxidases-
dc.titleRICE ACYL-COA-BINDING PROTEIN6 affects acyl-CoA homeostasis and growth in rice-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChye, ML: mlchye@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChye, ML=rp00687-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12284-020-00435-y-
dc.identifier.pmid33159253-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7647982-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85095456881-
dc.identifier.hkuros322310-
dc.identifier.volume13-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 75-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 75-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000587119000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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