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Article: Donor limb assessment after vascularized groin lymph node transfer for the treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema: clinical and lymphoscintigraphy findings

TitleDonor limb assessment after vascularized groin lymph node transfer for the treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema: clinical and lymphoscintigraphy findings
Authors
KeywordsBreast cancer-related lymphedema
Vascularized lymph node transfer
Groin lymph node flap
Reverse mapping
Lymphoscintigraphy
Issue Date2019
PublisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707671/description#description
Citation
Journal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, 2019, v. 72 n. 2, p. 216-224 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Vascularized lymph node transfer is an established treatment for secondary lymphedema. Different donor sites of lymph node flap have been described. In our institute, vascularized groin lymph node (VGLN) flap is the workhorse flap for treating breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Potential complications of VGLN flap harvesting include seroma formation, thigh dysaesthesia, and iatrogenic lymphedema. Methods: Between August 2013 and June 2016, 30 consecutive patients with a mean age of 60 years underwent VGLN transfer for BCRL. Reverse mapping of lower limb lymphatics with patent blue solution was performed in all cases. The donor limb conditions were assessed clinically with limb circumference measurement and radiologically with lymphoscintigraphy. Postoperative lymphoscintigraphy findings and transport indexes were compared between the donor and nonoperated limbs. Results: The mean follow-up period was 22.11 ± 7.83 months. Three (10%) patients developed groin seroma and 18 (60%) patients complained of transient thigh dysaesthesia. There was no clinically detectable donor limb lymphedema. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed at a mean of 13 months after operation. The mean transport indexes of the nonoperated limbs and donor limbs were 2.04 and 3.32, respectively. For the donor limbs, all patients had normal distribution pattern of contrast uptake. No dermal backflow pattern was demonstrated. Conclusion: With good knowledge of groin anatomy and meticulous surgical skills, VGLN flap can be harvested without causing major consequence to the donor limb.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/298721
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.74
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.855
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, HL-
dc.contributor.authorPang, SY-
dc.contributor.authorLee, CC-
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-12T03:02:28Z-
dc.date.available2021-04-12T03:02:28Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery, 2019, v. 72 n. 2, p. 216-224-
dc.identifier.issn1748-6815-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/298721-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Vascularized lymph node transfer is an established treatment for secondary lymphedema. Different donor sites of lymph node flap have been described. In our institute, vascularized groin lymph node (VGLN) flap is the workhorse flap for treating breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL). Potential complications of VGLN flap harvesting include seroma formation, thigh dysaesthesia, and iatrogenic lymphedema. Methods: Between August 2013 and June 2016, 30 consecutive patients with a mean age of 60 years underwent VGLN transfer for BCRL. Reverse mapping of lower limb lymphatics with patent blue solution was performed in all cases. The donor limb conditions were assessed clinically with limb circumference measurement and radiologically with lymphoscintigraphy. Postoperative lymphoscintigraphy findings and transport indexes were compared between the donor and nonoperated limbs. Results: The mean follow-up period was 22.11 ± 7.83 months. Three (10%) patients developed groin seroma and 18 (60%) patients complained of transient thigh dysaesthesia. There was no clinically detectable donor limb lymphedema. Lymphoscintigraphy was performed at a mean of 13 months after operation. The mean transport indexes of the nonoperated limbs and donor limbs were 2.04 and 3.32, respectively. For the donor limbs, all patients had normal distribution pattern of contrast uptake. No dermal backflow pattern was demonstrated. Conclusion: With good knowledge of groin anatomy and meticulous surgical skills, VGLN flap can be harvested without causing major consequence to the donor limb.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/wps/find/journaldescription.cws_home/707671/description#description-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Plastic, Reconstructive & Aesthetic Surgery-
dc.subjectBreast cancer-related lymphedema-
dc.subjectVascularized lymph node transfer-
dc.subjectGroin lymph node flap-
dc.subjectReverse mapping-
dc.subjectLymphoscintigraphy-
dc.titleDonor limb assessment after vascularized groin lymph node transfer for the treatment of breast cancer-related lymphedema: clinical and lymphoscintigraphy findings-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, HL: hlliu01@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, CC: gcclee@hku.hk-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.bjps.2018.10.013-
dc.identifier.pmid30472046-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85056818847-
dc.identifier.hkuros322010-
dc.identifier.volume72-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage216-
dc.identifier.epage224-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000456187300010-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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