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Article: Nurses' post‐traumatic stress symptoms and growth by perceived workplace bullying: An online cross‐sectional study

TitleNurses' post‐traumatic stress symptoms and growth by perceived workplace bullying: An online cross‐sectional study
Authors
Keywordsbullying
perception
post‐traumatic growth
post‐traumatic stress
psychological adaptation
Issue Date2021
PublisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-2834
Citation
Journal of Nursing Management, 2021, Epub 2021-01-23 How to Cite?
AbstractAim: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between workplace bullying and mental health, focusing on the indirect effect of post‐traumatic stress responses and moderation of nurses' perception of workplace bullying. Background: Post‐traumatic stress symptoms frequently result from workplace bullying, but how nurses' individual appraisals relate to negative consequences is unclear. Method: A cross‐sectional online survey was conducted with 319 Korean nurses; participants were divided into the perceived and non‐perceived workplace bullying groups. Moderated mediation models were tested using structural equation modelling with Stata version 16. Results: Regardless of nurses' appraisals, higher levels of workplace bullying were associated with poor mental health. Post‐traumatic stress symptoms indirectly impacted the relationship in both groups, but post‐traumatic growth did not. The perceived group showed a partial negative association between post‐traumatic growth and mental health. Conclusion: It is necessary to develop systems for early detection of mental health problems to create safe work environments not only for nurses who perceive workplace bullying but also for those who do not. Implications for Nursing Management: Staff education and institutional support that consider PTSS are recommended for all nurses.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/296306
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.325
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.925
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHong, S-
dc.contributor.authorKim, H-
dc.contributor.authorNAM, S-
dc.contributor.authorWong, JYH-
dc.contributor.authorLee, K-
dc.date.accessioned2021-02-22T04:53:27Z-
dc.date.available2021-02-22T04:53:27Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Nursing Management, 2021, Epub 2021-01-23-
dc.identifier.issn0966-0429-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/296306-
dc.description.abstractAim: The aim of this study was to explore the relationship between workplace bullying and mental health, focusing on the indirect effect of post‐traumatic stress responses and moderation of nurses' perception of workplace bullying. Background: Post‐traumatic stress symptoms frequently result from workplace bullying, but how nurses' individual appraisals relate to negative consequences is unclear. Method: A cross‐sectional online survey was conducted with 319 Korean nurses; participants were divided into the perceived and non‐perceived workplace bullying groups. Moderated mediation models were tested using structural equation modelling with Stata version 16. Results: Regardless of nurses' appraisals, higher levels of workplace bullying were associated with poor mental health. Post‐traumatic stress symptoms indirectly impacted the relationship in both groups, but post‐traumatic growth did not. The perceived group showed a partial negative association between post‐traumatic growth and mental health. Conclusion: It is necessary to develop systems for early detection of mental health problems to create safe work environments not only for nurses who perceive workplace bullying but also for those who do not. Implications for Nursing Management: Staff education and institutional support that consider PTSS are recommended for all nurses.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwell Publishing Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1365-2834-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Nursing Management-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectbullying-
dc.subjectperception-
dc.subjectpost‐traumatic growth-
dc.subjectpost‐traumatic stress-
dc.subjectpsychological adaptation-
dc.titleNurses' post‐traumatic stress symptoms and growth by perceived workplace bullying: An online cross‐sectional study-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWong, JYH: janetyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, JYH=rp01561-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/jonm.13275-
dc.identifier.pmid33486839-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85100629656-
dc.identifier.hkuros321357-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2021-01-23-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000615994400001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl0966-0429-

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