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Article: COVID-19 in children across three Asian cosmopolitan regions

TitleCOVID-19 in children across three Asian cosmopolitan regions
Authors
KeywordsCOVID-19
Asia
children
travel history
age-stratified
Issue Date2020
PublisherTaylor & Francis, published in association in with Shanghai Shangyixun Cultural Communication Company. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/temi20/current
Citation
Emerging Microbes & Infections, 2020, v. 9 n. 1, p. 2588-2596 How to Cite?
AbstractAs another wave of COVID-19 outbreak has approached in July 2020, a larger scale COVID-19 pediatric Asian cohort summarizing the clinical observations is warranted. Children confirmed with COVID-19 infection from the Republic of Korea, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) and Wuhan, China, during their first waves of local outbreaks were included. Their clinical characteristics and the temporal sequences of the first waves of local paediatric outbreaks were compared. Four hundred and twenty three children with COVID-19 were analyzed. Wuhan had the earliest peak, followed by Korea and HKSAR. Compared with Korea and Wuhan, patients in HKSAR were significantly older (mean age: 12.9 vs. 10.8 vs. 6.6 years, p < 0.001, respectively) and had more imported cases (87.5% vs. 16.5% vs. 0%, p < 0.001, respectively). The imported cases were also older (13.4 vs. 7.6 years, p < 0.001). More cases in HKSAR were asymptomatic compared to Korea and Wuhan (45.5% vs. 22.0% vs. 20.9%, p < 0.001, respectively), and significantly more patients from Wuhan developed fever (40.6% vs. 29.7% vs. 21.6%, p=0.003, respectively). There were significantly less imported cases than domestic cases developing fever after adjusting for age and region of origin (p = 0.046). 5.4% to 10.8% of patients reported anosmia and ageusia. None developed pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PMIS-TS). In general, adolescents were more likely to be asymptomatic and less likely to develop fever, but required longer hospital stays. In conclusion, majority patients in this pediatric Asian cohort had a mild disease. None developed PIMS-TS. Their clinical characteristics were influenced by travel history and age.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/295265
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 6.212
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.774
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorChua, GT-
dc.contributor.authorXiong, X-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, EH-
dc.contributor.authorHan, MS-
dc.contributor.authorChang, SH-
dc.contributor.authorJin, BL-
dc.contributor.authorLee, EJ-
dc.contributor.authorKim, BN-
dc.contributor.authorKim, MK-
dc.contributor.authorDoo, K-
dc.contributor.authorSeo, JH-
dc.contributor.authorKim, YJ-
dc.contributor.authorKim, YJ-
dc.contributor.authorPark, JY-
dc.contributor.authorSuh, SB-
dc.contributor.authorLee, H-
dc.contributor.authorCho, EY-
dc.contributor.authorKim, DH-
dc.contributor.authorKim, JM-
dc.contributor.authorKim, HY-
dc.contributor.authorPark, SE-
dc.contributor.authorLee, JK-
dc.contributor.authorJo, DS-
dc.contributor.authorCho, SM-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, JH-
dc.contributor.authorJo, KJ-
dc.contributor.authorChoe, YJ-
dc.contributor.authorKim, KH-
dc.contributor.authorChi, S-
dc.contributor.authorTang, ST-
dc.contributor.authorQin, H-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, LS-
dc.contributor.authorChen, P-
dc.contributor.authorWong, JSC-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KCC-
dc.contributor.authorYau, FYS-
dc.contributor.authorLam, SY-
dc.contributor.authorChow, CCK-
dc.contributor.authorWong, TW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, VCM-
dc.contributor.authorPoon, GWK-
dc.contributor.authorChow, CB-
dc.contributor.authorWong, WHS-
dc.contributor.authorLau, YL-
dc.contributor.authorChan, GCF-
dc.contributor.authorChui, CSL-
dc.contributor.authorLi, X-
dc.contributor.authorHo, MHK-
dc.contributor.authorWong, ICK-
dc.contributor.authorTam, PKH-
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKW-
dc.contributor.authorKim, JH-
dc.contributor.authorIp, P-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, MYW-
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-11T13:57:40Z-
dc.date.available2021-01-11T13:57:40Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Microbes & Infections, 2020, v. 9 n. 1, p. 2588-2596-
dc.identifier.issn2222-1751-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/295265-
dc.description.abstractAs another wave of COVID-19 outbreak has approached in July 2020, a larger scale COVID-19 pediatric Asian cohort summarizing the clinical observations is warranted. Children confirmed with COVID-19 infection from the Republic of Korea, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) and Wuhan, China, during their first waves of local outbreaks were included. Their clinical characteristics and the temporal sequences of the first waves of local paediatric outbreaks were compared. Four hundred and twenty three children with COVID-19 were analyzed. Wuhan had the earliest peak, followed by Korea and HKSAR. Compared with Korea and Wuhan, patients in HKSAR were significantly older (mean age: 12.9 vs. 10.8 vs. 6.6 years, p < 0.001, respectively) and had more imported cases (87.5% vs. 16.5% vs. 0%, p < 0.001, respectively). The imported cases were also older (13.4 vs. 7.6 years, p < 0.001). More cases in HKSAR were asymptomatic compared to Korea and Wuhan (45.5% vs. 22.0% vs. 20.9%, p < 0.001, respectively), and significantly more patients from Wuhan developed fever (40.6% vs. 29.7% vs. 21.6%, p=0.003, respectively). There were significantly less imported cases than domestic cases developing fever after adjusting for age and region of origin (p = 0.046). 5.4% to 10.8% of patients reported anosmia and ageusia. None developed pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome temporally associated with SARS-CoV-2 (PMIS-TS). In general, adolescents were more likely to be asymptomatic and less likely to develop fever, but required longer hospital stays. In conclusion, majority patients in this pediatric Asian cohort had a mild disease. None developed PIMS-TS. Their clinical characteristics were influenced by travel history and age.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis, published in association in with Shanghai Shangyixun Cultural Communication Company. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/temi20/current-
dc.relation.ispartofEmerging Microbes & Infections-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectCOVID-19-
dc.subjectAsia-
dc.subjectchildren-
dc.subjecttravel history-
dc.subjectage-stratified-
dc.titleCOVID-19 in children across three Asian cosmopolitan regions-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChua, GT: cgt560@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPoon, GWK: pwkg@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChow, CB: chowcb@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, WHS: whswong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLau, YL: lauylung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, GCF: gcfchan@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChui, CSL: cslchui@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLi, X: sxueli@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHo, MHK: marcoho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, ICK: wongick@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTam, PKH: paultam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTo, KKW: kelvinto@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailIp, P: patricip@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChua, GT=rp02684-
dc.identifier.authorityLau, YL=rp00361-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, GCF=rp00431-
dc.identifier.authorityChui, CSL=rp02527-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, X=rp02531-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, ICK=rp01480-
dc.identifier.authorityTam, PKH=rp00060-
dc.identifier.authorityTo, KKW=rp01384-
dc.identifier.authorityIp, P=rp01337-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/22221751.2020.1846462-
dc.identifier.pmid33138739-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7723019-
dc.identifier.hkuros320798-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage2588-
dc.identifier.epage2596-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000598742000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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