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Article: Exploring the role of simulation to foster interprofessional teamwork among medical and nursing students: A mixed-method pilot investigation in Hong Kong

TitleExploring the role of simulation to foster interprofessional teamwork among medical and nursing students: A mixed-method pilot investigation in Hong Kong
Authors
KeywordsSimulation
safety
crew Resource Management
teamwork
medical education
Issue Date2020
PublisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ijic20/current
Citation
Journal of Interprofessional Care, 2020, Epub 2020-12-08 How to Cite?
AbstractEffective teamwork is a critical component of maintaining patient safety. However, there is lack of clarity on the best teaching approach to interprofessional teamwork training in medical and nursing curricula. This study aimed to compare the effects of blended classroom plus clinical simulation versus clinical simulation alone on teamwork attitudes, perceptions and performance in medical and nursing students in Hong Kong. This was a pilot study with a mixed-method research design, with both quantitative and qualitative evaluations. Students who studied medicine or nursing courses at a university in Hong Kong were invited to this study. They were assigned into two groups: clinical simulation alone versus blended classroom plus clinical simulation. The primary outcome was attitudinal change related to teamwork behaviours, which was measured using the Human Factors Attitude Survey. The secondary outcomes were perceptions of team-based learning and teamwork performance, which were accessed by the Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument and Ottawa Global Rating Scale, respectively. Four focus group interviews were conducted after the training sessions. Conventional content analysis using inductive coding was performed with the qualitative data. Forty-six students participated in this study. There was a significant increase in the participants’ positive attitudes on teamwork for both groups (intervention: MD = 5.36 and control: MD = 3.6, p <.05); however, there was no significant difference on increasing positive attitudes between the groups (estimate = 1.76, 95% CI [−8.59, 5.06], p = .61). Qualitative analysis identified four themes: (1) reconsidering professional roles in managing patients; (2) embodying the experience to share responsibility and complement each other’s skills; (3) realizing the importance of trust and communication; and (4) engaging to achieve the mission within a limited time. This pilot study found that a blended classroom did not further improve teamwork attitudes, perceptions and performance in medical and nursing students compared with clinical simulation alone. Qualitative findings showed that students had reconsidered their professional roles in managing patients and realized the importance of teamwork in caring patients.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/295221
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.338
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.806
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWai, AKC-
dc.contributor.authorLam, VSF-
dc.contributor.authorNg, ZLH-
dc.contributor.authorPang, MTH-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, VWY-
dc.contributor.authorLee, JJJ-
dc.contributor.authorWong, JYH-
dc.date.accessioned2021-01-11T13:57:03Z-
dc.date.available2021-01-11T13:57:03Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Interprofessional Care, 2020, Epub 2020-12-08-
dc.identifier.issn1356-1820-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/295221-
dc.description.abstractEffective teamwork is a critical component of maintaining patient safety. However, there is lack of clarity on the best teaching approach to interprofessional teamwork training in medical and nursing curricula. This study aimed to compare the effects of blended classroom plus clinical simulation versus clinical simulation alone on teamwork attitudes, perceptions and performance in medical and nursing students in Hong Kong. This was a pilot study with a mixed-method research design, with both quantitative and qualitative evaluations. Students who studied medicine or nursing courses at a university in Hong Kong were invited to this study. They were assigned into two groups: clinical simulation alone versus blended classroom plus clinical simulation. The primary outcome was attitudinal change related to teamwork behaviours, which was measured using the Human Factors Attitude Survey. The secondary outcomes were perceptions of team-based learning and teamwork performance, which were accessed by the Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument and Ottawa Global Rating Scale, respectively. Four focus group interviews were conducted after the training sessions. Conventional content analysis using inductive coding was performed with the qualitative data. Forty-six students participated in this study. There was a significant increase in the participants’ positive attitudes on teamwork for both groups (intervention: MD = 5.36 and control: MD = 3.6, p <.05); however, there was no significant difference on increasing positive attitudes between the groups (estimate = 1.76, 95% CI [−8.59, 5.06], p = .61). Qualitative analysis identified four themes: (1) reconsidering professional roles in managing patients; (2) embodying the experience to share responsibility and complement each other’s skills; (3) realizing the importance of trust and communication; and (4) engaging to achieve the mission within a limited time. This pilot study found that a blended classroom did not further improve teamwork attitudes, perceptions and performance in medical and nursing students compared with clinical simulation alone. Qualitative findings showed that students had reconsidered their professional roles in managing patients and realized the importance of teamwork in caring patients.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.tandfonline.com/toc/ijic20/current-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Interprofessional Care-
dc.rightsThis is an Accepted Manuscript of an article published by Taylor & Francis in [JOURNAL TITLE] on [date of publication], available online: http://www.tandfonline.com/[Article DOI].-
dc.subjectSimulation-
dc.subjectsafety-
dc.subjectcrew Resource Management-
dc.subjectteamwork-
dc.subjectmedical education-
dc.titleExploring the role of simulation to foster interprofessional teamwork among medical and nursing students: A mixed-method pilot investigation in Hong Kong-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailWai, AKC: awai@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, VSF: veronica@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailNg, ZLH: zoenglh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailPang, MTH: pangthm@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsang, VWY: tsangwyv@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLee, JJJ: leejay@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, JYH: janetyh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityWai, AKC=rp02261-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, VSF=rp00261-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, JJJ=rp02239-
dc.identifier.authorityWong, JYH=rp01561-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13561820.2020.1831451-
dc.identifier.hkuros320864-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-12-08-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000597020200001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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