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Article: Time machine biology: Cross-timescale integration of ecology, evolution, and oceanography

TitleTime machine biology: Cross-timescale integration of ecology, evolution, and oceanography
Authors
Issue Date2020
PublisherOceanography Society. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tos.org/oceanography/
Citation
Oceanography, 2020, v. 33 n. 2, p. 16-28 How to Cite?
AbstractDirect observations of marine ecosystems are inherently limited in their temporal scope. Yet, ongoing global anthropogenic change urgently requires improved understanding of long-term baselines, greater insight into the relationship between climate and biodiversity, and knowledge of the evolutionary consequences of our actions. Sediment cores can provide this understanding by linking data on the responses of marine biota to reconstructions of past environmental and climatic change. Given continuous sedimentation and robust age control, studies of sediment cores have the potential to constrain the state and dynamics of past climates and ecosystems on timescales of centuries to millions of years. Here, we review the development and recent advances in “ocean drilling paleobiology”—a synthetic science with potential to illumi-nate the interplay and relative importance of ecological and evolutionary factors during times of global change. Climate, specifically temperature, appears to control Cenozoic marine ecosystems on million-year, millennial, centennial, and anthropogenic time-scales. Although certainly not the only factor controlling biodiversity dynamics, the effect size of temperature is large for both pelagic and deep-sea ecosystems. © 2020, Oceanography Society. All rights reserved.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/294050
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.431
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.579
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorYasuhara, M-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, HH-
dc.contributor.authorHull, P-
dc.contributor.authorRillo, MC-
dc.contributor.authorCondamine, FL-
dc.contributor.authorTittensor, DP-
dc.contributor.authorKučera, M-
dc.contributor.authorCostello, MJ-
dc.contributor.authorFinnegan, S-
dc.contributor.authorO’Dea, A-
dc.contributor.authorHong, Y-
dc.contributor.authorBonebrake, TC-
dc.contributor.authorMc Kenzie, NR-
dc.contributor.authorDoi, H-
dc.contributor.authorWei, CL-
dc.contributor.authorKubota, Y-
dc.contributor.authorSaupe, EE-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:25:37Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:25:37Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationOceanography, 2020, v. 33 n. 2, p. 16-28-
dc.identifier.issn1042-8275-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/294050-
dc.description.abstractDirect observations of marine ecosystems are inherently limited in their temporal scope. Yet, ongoing global anthropogenic change urgently requires improved understanding of long-term baselines, greater insight into the relationship between climate and biodiversity, and knowledge of the evolutionary consequences of our actions. Sediment cores can provide this understanding by linking data on the responses of marine biota to reconstructions of past environmental and climatic change. Given continuous sedimentation and robust age control, studies of sediment cores have the potential to constrain the state and dynamics of past climates and ecosystems on timescales of centuries to millions of years. Here, we review the development and recent advances in “ocean drilling paleobiology”—a synthetic science with potential to illumi-nate the interplay and relative importance of ecological and evolutionary factors during times of global change. Climate, specifically temperature, appears to control Cenozoic marine ecosystems on million-year, millennial, centennial, and anthropogenic time-scales. Although certainly not the only factor controlling biodiversity dynamics, the effect size of temperature is large for both pelagic and deep-sea ecosystems. © 2020, Oceanography Society. All rights reserved.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOceanography Society. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tos.org/oceanography/-
dc.relation.ispartofOceanography-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.titleTime machine biology: Cross-timescale integration of ecology, evolution, and oceanography-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailYasuhara, M: yasuhara@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHuang, HH: mayhhh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailMc Kenzie, NR: ryan00@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYasuhara, M=rp01474-
dc.identifier.authorityMc Kenzie, NR=rp02198-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.5670/oceanog.2020.225-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85092913372-
dc.identifier.hkuros318850-
dc.identifier.volume33-
dc.identifier.issue2-
dc.identifier.spage16-
dc.identifier.epage28-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000576988100006-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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