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Article: Telehealth cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorder: A pilot examining feasibility, satisfaction, and preliminary findings

TitleTelehealth cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorder: A pilot examining feasibility, satisfaction, and preliminary findings
Authors
KeywordsAutism
Child
Cognitive behavioral therapy
Insomnia
Parent
Telehealth
Issue Date2021
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105478
Citation
Autism, 2021, v. 25 n. 3, p. 667-680 How to Cite?
AbstractInsomnia is common in children with autism. Cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia may improve sleep and functioning in children with autism and their parents, but delivery involving multiple office visits limits accessibility. This single-arm pilot study tested telehealth delivery of eight-session cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia in 17 children (6–12 years) with autism spectrum disorder and insomnia and their parent(s). Treatment integrity was assessed each session (delivery, by therapist; receipt, participant understanding; and enactment, home practice). Treatment satisfaction was assessed after treatment. Children and parents wore actigraphs and completed electronic diaries for 2 weeks, children completed 5-min Holter Monitoring (assessed heart rate variability, physiological arousal indicator), and parents completed Aberrant Behavior Checklist before and after 1 month. Average integrity scores were high (98%, delivery; 93%, receipt; and 82%, enactment). Parents found cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia helpful, age-appropriate, and autism-friendly. Paired-samples t-tests (family-wise error controlled) indicated telehealth cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia improved child and parent sleep (objective and subjective) and functioning (child—decreased irritability, lethargy, stereotypy, hyperactivity; parent—decreased fatigue). At 1 month, inappropriate speech also decreased, but hyperactivity was no longer decreased. Other gains were maintained. Most children demonstrated reduced arousal following treatment. This pilot shows telehealth cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia is feasible and may improve child and parent sleep, child behavior and arousal, and parent fatigue. A randomized controlled trial of telehealth cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia for children with autism is needed.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293732
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 5.689
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.899
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorMcCrae, CS-
dc.contributor.authorChan, WS-
dc.contributor.authorCurtis, AF-
dc.contributor.authorNair, N-
dc.contributor.authorDeroche, CB-
dc.contributor.authorMunoz, M-
dc.contributor.authorTakamatsu, S-
dc.contributor.authorMcLean, D-
dc.contributor.authorDavenport, M-
dc.contributor.authorMuckerman, JE-
dc.contributor.authorTakahashi, N-
dc.contributor.authorMcCann, D-
dc.contributor.authorMcGovney, K-
dc.contributor.authorSahota, P-
dc.contributor.authorMazurek, MO-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:21:01Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:21:01Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationAutism, 2021, v. 25 n. 3, p. 667-680-
dc.identifier.issn1362-3613-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293732-
dc.description.abstractInsomnia is common in children with autism. Cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia may improve sleep and functioning in children with autism and their parents, but delivery involving multiple office visits limits accessibility. This single-arm pilot study tested telehealth delivery of eight-session cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia in 17 children (6–12 years) with autism spectrum disorder and insomnia and their parent(s). Treatment integrity was assessed each session (delivery, by therapist; receipt, participant understanding; and enactment, home practice). Treatment satisfaction was assessed after treatment. Children and parents wore actigraphs and completed electronic diaries for 2 weeks, children completed 5-min Holter Monitoring (assessed heart rate variability, physiological arousal indicator), and parents completed Aberrant Behavior Checklist before and after 1 month. Average integrity scores were high (98%, delivery; 93%, receipt; and 82%, enactment). Parents found cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia helpful, age-appropriate, and autism-friendly. Paired-samples t-tests (family-wise error controlled) indicated telehealth cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia improved child and parent sleep (objective and subjective) and functioning (child—decreased irritability, lethargy, stereotypy, hyperactivity; parent—decreased fatigue). At 1 month, inappropriate speech also decreased, but hyperactivity was no longer decreased. Other gains were maintained. Most children demonstrated reduced arousal following treatment. This pilot shows telehealth cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia is feasible and may improve child and parent sleep, child behavior and arousal, and parent fatigue. A randomized controlled trial of telehealth cognitive behavioral treatment for childhood insomnia for children with autism is needed.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.sagepub.co.uk/journal.aspx?pid=105478-
dc.relation.ispartofAutism-
dc.subjectAutism-
dc.subjectChild-
dc.subjectCognitive behavioral therapy-
dc.subjectInsomnia-
dc.subjectParent-
dc.subjectTelehealth-
dc.titleTelehealth cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia in children with autism spectrum disorder: A pilot examining feasibility, satisfaction, and preliminary findings-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailChan, WS: chanwais@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, WS=rp02506-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1362361320949078-
dc.identifier.pmid32838539-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85089869033-
dc.identifier.hkuros319273-
dc.identifier.volume25-
dc.identifier.issue3-
dc.identifier.spage667-
dc.identifier.epage680-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000563028200001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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