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Article: Effects of Downward Intrusion of Saline Water on Nested Groundwater Flow Systems

TitleEffects of Downward Intrusion of Saline Water on Nested Groundwater Flow Systems
Authors
Keywordsgroundwater flow systems
density‐dependent flow
saline water downward intrusion
Issue Date2020
PublisherAmerican Geophysical Union. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.agu.org/journals/wr/
Citation
Water Resources Research, 2020, v. 56 n. 10, p. article no. e2020WR028377 How to Cite?
AbstractNested groundwater flow systems (NGFS) are commonplace in various hydrogeological environments, including endorheic basins and coastal aquifers. The subsystems of the NGFS can be spatially separated by streamlines around the internal stagnation points. At the discharge zones of the topographic depressions, saline water often emerges due to high evaporation in endorheic drainage basins or the combined effects of evaporation and intermittent seawater submersion in coastal areas. To date, there are limited studies that have considered the impact of local‐scale downward migration of saline plumes in the topographic depressions on the NGFS. In this study, the classic NGFS are revisited by considering saline water in their discharge zones. To quantify the effects of salinity in the discharge zones on the NGFS, scenarios of various salinities in the discharge zones are simulated. The displacements of the internal stagnation points are used to quantify the evolution of the NGFS in response to salinity changes in the discharge zones. The results show that, as the salinity in the discharge zones increases, the hydraulic gradient near the discharge zone can be significantly reduced, the internal stagnation points shift upward, and the local groundwater flow systems retreat upward so that their original spaces are replaced by intermediate or regional flow systems. The discharge zone is expanded, and the overall groundwater flow velocity magnitude of the entire system decreases with salinity. This study may shed light on the management of saline wetlands, for example, the control of groundwater salinization, evolution of saline groundwater basins, and seawater intrusion.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293674
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 4.309
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.661
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZHANG, X-
dc.contributor.authorJiao, JJ-
dc.contributor.authorLi, H-
dc.contributor.authorLuo, X-
dc.contributor.authorKuang, X-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:20:11Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:20:11Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationWater Resources Research, 2020, v. 56 n. 10, p. article no. e2020WR028377-
dc.identifier.issn0043-1397-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293674-
dc.description.abstractNested groundwater flow systems (NGFS) are commonplace in various hydrogeological environments, including endorheic basins and coastal aquifers. The subsystems of the NGFS can be spatially separated by streamlines around the internal stagnation points. At the discharge zones of the topographic depressions, saline water often emerges due to high evaporation in endorheic drainage basins or the combined effects of evaporation and intermittent seawater submersion in coastal areas. To date, there are limited studies that have considered the impact of local‐scale downward migration of saline plumes in the topographic depressions on the NGFS. In this study, the classic NGFS are revisited by considering saline water in their discharge zones. To quantify the effects of salinity in the discharge zones on the NGFS, scenarios of various salinities in the discharge zones are simulated. The displacements of the internal stagnation points are used to quantify the evolution of the NGFS in response to salinity changes in the discharge zones. The results show that, as the salinity in the discharge zones increases, the hydraulic gradient near the discharge zone can be significantly reduced, the internal stagnation points shift upward, and the local groundwater flow systems retreat upward so that their original spaces are replaced by intermediate or regional flow systems. The discharge zone is expanded, and the overall groundwater flow velocity magnitude of the entire system decreases with salinity. This study may shed light on the management of saline wetlands, for example, the control of groundwater salinization, evolution of saline groundwater basins, and seawater intrusion.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Geophysical Union. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.agu.org/journals/wr/-
dc.relation.ispartofWater Resources Research-
dc.rightsWater Resources Research. Copyright © American Geophysical Union.-
dc.rights©[2020]. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. This article is available at http://dx.doi.org/10.1029/2020WR028377-
dc.subjectgroundwater flow systems-
dc.subjectdensity‐dependent flow-
dc.subjectsaline water downward intrusion-
dc.titleEffects of Downward Intrusion of Saline Water on Nested Groundwater Flow Systems-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailJiao, JJ: jjiao@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLuo, X: xinluo@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityJiao, JJ=rp00712-
dc.identifier.authorityLuo, X=rp02606-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1029/2020WR028377-
dc.identifier.hkuros319544-
dc.identifier.volume56-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e2020WR028377-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e2020WR028377-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000586456800026-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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