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Article: Different glycaemia‐related risk factors for incident Alzheimer's disease in men and women with type 2 diabetes—A sex‐specific analysis of the Hong Kong diabetes database

TitleDifferent glycaemia‐related risk factors for incident Alzheimer's disease in men and women with type 2 diabetes—A sex‐specific analysis of the Hong Kong diabetes database
Authors
KeywordsAlzheimer's disease
Chinese
Diabetes
Glycaemia
HbA1c variability
Issue Date2021
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1520-7560
Citation
Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, 2021, v. 37 n. 6, article no. e3401 How to Cite?
AbstractAims: Sexual dimorphism has been reported in the epidemiology, neurobiologic susceptibility and clinical presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As poor glycaemic control is associated with increased risks of AD, we aimed to investigate whether glycaemia‐related risk factors also differ between men and women, using a retrospective, sex‐specific analysis of a large Chinese cohort with diabetes. Materials & Methods: A total of 85,514 Chinese individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D; 46,783 women and 38,731 men), aged ≥60 years, were identified from electronic health records and observed for incident AD. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations with incident AD of several glycaemia‐related risk factors, including severe hypoglycaemia, mean HbA1c and indices of HbA1c variability, in men and women separately. Results: Over a median follow‐up of 6 years, women had a higher incidence of AD than men (2.3% vs. 1.2%, p < 0.001). Both men and women shared the same independent non‐glycaemic clinical predictors, which included older age, lower body mass index and longer duration of diabetes. However, for glycaemia‐related risk factors, we observed that severe hypoglycaemia and indices of HbA1c variability were independent predictors of incident AD in women but not in men, and the associations were irrespective of their baseline glycaemic control and duration of diabetes. Conclusions: Our findings highlighted that glycaemia‐related risk factors for incident AD differ between men and women with T2D. Strategies to maintain glycaemic stability and avoid severe hypoglycaemia might be especially important to preserve healthy cognition in older women with diabetes.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293396
ISSN
2021 Impact Factor: 8.128
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.307
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, CH-
dc.contributor.authorLui, DTW-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CYY-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, YC-
dc.contributor.authorFong, CHY-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, MMA-
dc.contributor.authorShea, YF-
dc.contributor.authorSiu, DCW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH-
dc.contributor.authorChow, WS-
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSL-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-23T08:16:09Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-23T08:16:09Z-
dc.date.issued2021-
dc.identifier.citationDiabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, 2021, v. 37 n. 6, article no. e3401-
dc.identifier.issn1520-7560-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/293396-
dc.description.abstractAims: Sexual dimorphism has been reported in the epidemiology, neurobiologic susceptibility and clinical presentation of Alzheimer's disease (AD). As poor glycaemic control is associated with increased risks of AD, we aimed to investigate whether glycaemia‐related risk factors also differ between men and women, using a retrospective, sex‐specific analysis of a large Chinese cohort with diabetes. Materials & Methods: A total of 85,514 Chinese individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2D; 46,783 women and 38,731 men), aged ≥60 years, were identified from electronic health records and observed for incident AD. Multivariable Cox regression analysis was used to evaluate the associations with incident AD of several glycaemia‐related risk factors, including severe hypoglycaemia, mean HbA1c and indices of HbA1c variability, in men and women separately. Results: Over a median follow‐up of 6 years, women had a higher incidence of AD than men (2.3% vs. 1.2%, p < 0.001). Both men and women shared the same independent non‐glycaemic clinical predictors, which included older age, lower body mass index and longer duration of diabetes. However, for glycaemia‐related risk factors, we observed that severe hypoglycaemia and indices of HbA1c variability were independent predictors of incident AD in women but not in men, and the associations were irrespective of their baseline glycaemic control and duration of diabetes. Conclusions: Our findings highlighted that glycaemia‐related risk factors for incident AD differ between men and women with T2D. Strategies to maintain glycaemic stability and avoid severe hypoglycaemia might be especially important to preserve healthy cognition in older women with diabetes.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1520-7560-
dc.relation.ispartofDiabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews-
dc.rightsThis is the peer reviewed version of the following article: Diabetes/Metabolism Research and Reviews, 2021, v. 37 n. 6, article no. e3401, which has been published in final form at https://doi.org/10.1002/dmrr.3401. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectAlzheimer's disease-
dc.subjectChinese-
dc.subjectDiabetes-
dc.subjectGlycaemia-
dc.subjectHbA1c variability-
dc.titleDifferent glycaemia‐related risk factors for incident Alzheimer's disease in men and women with type 2 diabetes—A sex‐specific analysis of the Hong Kong diabetes database-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, CH: pchlee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLui, DTW: dtwlui@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, CYY: cyy0219@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWoo, YC: wooyucho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFong, CHY: kalofong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, MMA: mmayuen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailShea, YF: yfshea@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailSiu, DCW: cwdsiu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KH: koonho@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChow, WS: chowws01@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, CH=rp02043-
dc.identifier.authorityLui, DTW=rp02803-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, CYY=rp02243-
dc.identifier.authoritySiu, DCW=rp00534-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KH=rp00537-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/dmrr.3401-
dc.identifier.pmid32870568-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85090578831-
dc.identifier.hkuros320092-
dc.identifier.volume37-
dc.identifier.issue6-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e3401-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e3401-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000567910200001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl1520-7552-

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