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Article: Neurological soft signs discriminate schizophrenia from major depression but not bipolar disorder

TitleNeurological soft signs discriminate schizophrenia from major depression but not bipolar disorder
Authors
KeywordsSchizophrenia
Neurological soft signs
Prevalence rate
Bipolar disorder
Major depression
Discriminant analysis
Issue Date2013
Citation
Progress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, 2013, v. 43, p. 72-78 How to Cite?
AbstractBackground: Neurological soft signs (NSS) are minor neurological abnormalities, including motor, sensory, and inhibitory dysfunction. Schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with a higher prevalence of NSS. However, the relationships between NSS and schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression are unclear. The present study aimed to examine the specificity of NSS among these three clinical groups. Method: A total of 120 demographically matched participants (30 each in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and healthy controls) were recruited for the study. NSS subscales of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) were administered to each participant. Results: Significant differences were found in the total score of NSS (p < 0.01), and the subscale scores for motor coordination (p < 0.01), sensory integration (p = 0.01) and disinhibition (p < 0.01). Both patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder showed more total NSS signs than healthy controls (p < 0.01). Patients with schizophrenia also showed more total NSS signs than patients with major depression (p = 0.02). Both patients with schizophrenia and patients with bipolar disorder showed more motor coordination signs than healthy controls and patients with major depression (p < 0.05). Moreover, compared with healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia showed more disinhibition signs (p < 0.01), while patients with bipolar disorder showed more sensory integration signs (p < 0.01). Discriminant analysis showed 77.5% of correct classification of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from patients with major depression and healthy controls. Conclusions: NSS are not unique to schizophrenia, but are also found in bipolar disorder, while patients with major depression are comparable to normal controls. Our results suggest that NSS, especially motor-coordination signs, can differentiate schizophrenia from major depression but not bipolar disorder. Our results may provide further evidence to support the similarity between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from the dimension of behavioral expression. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/292040
ISSN
2021 Impact Factor: 5.201
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.716
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Qing-
dc.contributor.authorMa, Yan Tao-
dc.contributor.authorLui, Simon S.Y.-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, Wen Hua-
dc.contributor.authorXu, Ting-
dc.contributor.authorYu, Xin-
dc.contributor.authorTan, Shu Ping-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Zhi Ren-
dc.contributor.authorQu, Miao-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Ya-
dc.contributor.authorHuang, Jia-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, Eric F.C.-
dc.contributor.authorDazzan, Paola-
dc.contributor.authorChan, Raymond C.K.-
dc.date.accessioned2020-11-17T14:55:38Z-
dc.date.available2020-11-17T14:55:38Z-
dc.date.issued2013-
dc.identifier.citationProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry, 2013, v. 43, p. 72-78-
dc.identifier.issn0278-5846-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/292040-
dc.description.abstractBackground: Neurological soft signs (NSS) are minor neurological abnormalities, including motor, sensory, and inhibitory dysfunction. Schizophrenia and other neuropsychiatric disorders are associated with a higher prevalence of NSS. However, the relationships between NSS and schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and major depression are unclear. The present study aimed to examine the specificity of NSS among these three clinical groups. Method: A total of 120 demographically matched participants (30 each in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, major depression, and healthy controls) were recruited for the study. NSS subscales of the Cambridge Neurological Inventory (CNI) were administered to each participant. Results: Significant differences were found in the total score of NSS (p < 0.01), and the subscale scores for motor coordination (p < 0.01), sensory integration (p = 0.01) and disinhibition (p < 0.01). Both patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder showed more total NSS signs than healthy controls (p < 0.01). Patients with schizophrenia also showed more total NSS signs than patients with major depression (p = 0.02). Both patients with schizophrenia and patients with bipolar disorder showed more motor coordination signs than healthy controls and patients with major depression (p < 0.05). Moreover, compared with healthy controls, patients with schizophrenia showed more disinhibition signs (p < 0.01), while patients with bipolar disorder showed more sensory integration signs (p < 0.01). Discriminant analysis showed 77.5% of correct classification of patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from patients with major depression and healthy controls. Conclusions: NSS are not unique to schizophrenia, but are also found in bipolar disorder, while patients with major depression are comparable to normal controls. Our results suggest that NSS, especially motor-coordination signs, can differentiate schizophrenia from major depression but not bipolar disorder. Our results may provide further evidence to support the similarity between schizophrenia and bipolar disorder from the dimension of behavioral expression. © 2012 Elsevier Inc.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.relation.ispartofProgress in Neuro-Psychopharmacology and Biological Psychiatry-
dc.subjectSchizophrenia-
dc.subjectNeurological soft signs-
dc.subjectPrevalence rate-
dc.subjectBipolar disorder-
dc.subjectMajor depression-
dc.subjectDiscriminant analysis-
dc.titleNeurological soft signs discriminate schizophrenia from major depression but not bipolar disorder-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pnpbp.2012.12.006-
dc.identifier.pmid23266480-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-84872392239-
dc.identifier.hkuros320834-
dc.identifier.volume43-
dc.identifier.spage72-
dc.identifier.epage78-
dc.identifier.eissn1878-4216-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000317878700010-
dc.identifier.issnl0278-5846-

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