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Article: Meta-analysis of effects of exclusive breastfeeding on infant gut microbiota across populations

TitleMeta-analysis of effects of exclusive breastfeeding on infant gut microbiota across populations
Authors
Keywordsbiodiversity
breast feeding
diarrhea
dysbiosis
female
Issue Date2018
PublisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ncomms/index.html
Citation
Nature Communications, 2018, v. 9 n. 1, p. article no. 4169 How to Cite?
AbstractPrevious studies on the differences in gut microbiota between exclusively breastfed (EBF) and non-EBF infants have provided highly variable results. Here we perform a meta-analysis of seven microbiome studies (1825 stool samples from 684 infants) to compare the gut microbiota of non-EBF and EBF infants across populations. In the first 6 months of life, gut bacterial diversity, microbiota age, relative abundances of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and predicted microbial pathways related to carbohydrate metabolism are consistently higher in non-EBF than in EBF infants, whereas relative abundances of pathways related to lipid metabolism, vitamin metabolism, and detoxification are lower. Variation in predicted microbial pathways associated with non-EBF infants is larger among infants born by Caesarian section than among those vaginally delivered. Longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced diarrhea-related gut microbiota dysbiosis. Furthermore, differences in gut microbiota between EBF and non-EBF infants persist after 6 months of age. Our findings elucidate some mechanisms of short and long-term benefits of exclusive breastfeeding across different populations.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/290014
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 12.121
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 6.539
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHo, NT-
dc.contributor.authorLi, F-
dc.contributor.authorLee-Sarwar, KA-
dc.contributor.authorTun, HM-
dc.contributor.authorBrown, BP-
dc.contributor.authorPannaraj, PS-
dc.contributor.authorBender, JM-
dc.contributor.authorAzad, MB-
dc.contributor.authorThompson, AL-
dc.contributor.authorWeiss, ST-
dc.contributor.authorAzcarate-Peril, MA-
dc.contributor.authorLitonjua, AA-
dc.contributor.authorKozyrskyj, AL-
dc.contributor.authorJaspan, HB-
dc.contributor.authorAldrovandi, GM-
dc.contributor.authorKuhn, L-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:20:43Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:20:43Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationNature Communications, 2018, v. 9 n. 1, p. article no. 4169-
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/290014-
dc.description.abstractPrevious studies on the differences in gut microbiota between exclusively breastfed (EBF) and non-EBF infants have provided highly variable results. Here we perform a meta-analysis of seven microbiome studies (1825 stool samples from 684 infants) to compare the gut microbiota of non-EBF and EBF infants across populations. In the first 6 months of life, gut bacterial diversity, microbiota age, relative abundances of Bacteroidetes and Firmicutes, and predicted microbial pathways related to carbohydrate metabolism are consistently higher in non-EBF than in EBF infants, whereas relative abundances of pathways related to lipid metabolism, vitamin metabolism, and detoxification are lower. Variation in predicted microbial pathways associated with non-EBF infants is larger among infants born by Caesarian section than among those vaginally delivered. Longer duration of exclusive breastfeeding is associated with reduced diarrhea-related gut microbiota dysbiosis. Furthermore, differences in gut microbiota between EBF and non-EBF infants persist after 6 months of age. Our findings elucidate some mechanisms of short and long-term benefits of exclusive breastfeeding across different populations.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherNature Research (part of Springer Nature): Fully open access journals. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.nature.com/ncomms/index.html-
dc.relation.ispartofNature Communications-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectbiodiversity-
dc.subjectbreast feeding-
dc.subjectdiarrhea-
dc.subjectdysbiosis-
dc.subjectfemale-
dc.titleMeta-analysis of effects of exclusive breastfeeding on infant gut microbiota across populations-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailTun, HM: heinmtun@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityTun, HM=rp02389-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1038/s41467-018-06473-x-
dc.identifier.pmid30301893-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6177445-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85054559204-
dc.identifier.hkuros316825-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 4169-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 4169-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000446800200007-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl2041-1723-

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