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Article: Nanoscale Organization and Functional Analysis of Carnivorous Plant Mucilage by Atomic Force Microscopy

TitleNanoscale Organization and Functional Analysis of Carnivorous Plant Mucilage by Atomic Force Microscopy
Authors
KeywordsForce
Substrates
Organizations
Nanostructures
Scanning electron microscopy
Issue Date2020
PublisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=7729
Citation
IEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology, 2020, v. 19, p. 579-593 How to Cite?
AbstractUncovering the underlying mechanisms guiding the behaviors of natural sticky glue is of important significance for developing novel biomimetic or bioinspired materials to regulate cellular activities. Carnivorous plants secrete adhesive mucilage to capture insects, but the nanoscale organizations of the mucilage are still not fully understood. In particular, the advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for investigating the structures and properties of biological samples in their native states with unprecedented spatial resolution, offering novel possibilities for the studies of characterizing biomaterials. In this work, AFM was utilized to reveal the nanostructures of mucilage secreted by carnivorous plant (Pinguicula and Sarracenia) for promoting cell growth. AFM imaging of the mucilage-coated substrates in air showed that nanostructures (nanoparticles and nanofibers) with different assembly behaviors were significantly observed in mucilage, which were confirmed by electron microscopy imaging. AFM in situ imaging in liquids remarkably revealed that nanoparticles were contained in native mucilage. The mechanical properties of individual nanofibers were visualized and quantified by AFM indenting assays. The elemental organizations of the mucilage were analyzed, and the experiments of cells grown on mucilage-coated substrates indicated that carnivorous plant mucilage could facilitate cell growth. The research provides novel insights into the nanostructures and mechanical properties as well as biological functions of mucilage secreted by carnivorous plants, which will have potential impacts on the studies of biomaterials for tuning cell behaviors.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289717
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.57
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.574
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLi, M-
dc.contributor.authorXi, N-
dc.contributor.authorWang, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLiu, L-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:16:28Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:16:28Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationIEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology, 2020, v. 19, p. 579-593-
dc.identifier.issn1536-125X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289717-
dc.description.abstractUncovering the underlying mechanisms guiding the behaviors of natural sticky glue is of important significance for developing novel biomimetic or bioinspired materials to regulate cellular activities. Carnivorous plants secrete adhesive mucilage to capture insects, but the nanoscale organizations of the mucilage are still not fully understood. In particular, the advent of atomic force microscopy (AFM) provides a powerful tool for investigating the structures and properties of biological samples in their native states with unprecedented spatial resolution, offering novel possibilities for the studies of characterizing biomaterials. In this work, AFM was utilized to reveal the nanostructures of mucilage secreted by carnivorous plant (Pinguicula and Sarracenia) for promoting cell growth. AFM imaging of the mucilage-coated substrates in air showed that nanostructures (nanoparticles and nanofibers) with different assembly behaviors were significantly observed in mucilage, which were confirmed by electron microscopy imaging. AFM in situ imaging in liquids remarkably revealed that nanoparticles were contained in native mucilage. The mechanical properties of individual nanofibers were visualized and quantified by AFM indenting assays. The elemental organizations of the mucilage were analyzed, and the experiments of cells grown on mucilage-coated substrates indicated that carnivorous plant mucilage could facilitate cell growth. The research provides novel insights into the nanostructures and mechanical properties as well as biological functions of mucilage secreted by carnivorous plants, which will have potential impacts on the studies of biomaterials for tuning cell behaviors.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherIEEE. The Journal's web site is located at http://ieeexplore.ieee.org/xpl/RecentIssue.jsp?punumber=7729-
dc.relation.ispartofIEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology-
dc.rightsIEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology. Copyright © IEEE.-
dc.rights©20xx IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. Permission from IEEE must be obtained for all other uses, in any current or future media, including reprinting/republishing this material for advertising or promotional purposes, creating new collective works, for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or reuse of any copyrighted component of this work in other works.-
dc.subjectForce-
dc.subjectSubstrates-
dc.subjectOrganizations-
dc.subjectNanostructures-
dc.subjectScanning electron microscopy-
dc.titleNanoscale Organization and Functional Analysis of Carnivorous Plant Mucilage by Atomic Force Microscopy-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailXi, N: xining@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityXi, N=rp02044-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1109/TNANO.2020.3005731-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85088802433-
dc.identifier.hkuros316337-
dc.identifier.volume19-
dc.identifier.spage579-
dc.identifier.epage593-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000554886000003-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl1536-125X-

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