File Download

There are no files associated with this item.

  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Non-pharmacological depression therapies for older Chinese adults: A systematic review & meta-analysis

TitleNon-pharmacological depression therapies for older Chinese adults: A systematic review & meta-analysis
Authors
KeywordsChinese older adult
Depression
Health outcome
Non-pharmacological therapy
Systematic review
Issue Date2020
PublisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/archger
Citation
Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2020, v. 88, p. article no. 104037 How to Cite?
AbstractPurpose: To conduct a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to evaluate the evidence for the use of non-pharmacological depression therapies in older Chinese adults. Materials and methods: The population was individuals of Chinese extraction over the age of 60 who meet the criteria for depression. The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA). Six healthcare databases were systematically searched for publications to the end date July 2018. Included study variables were extracted and methodological quality assessments were performed. Ten studies reported sufficient data for meta-analysis. Results: Fifteen experimental and quasi-experimental studies fulfilled the selection criteria (N = 904 participants). Twelve studies provided sufficient data to evaluate the therapies using Effect Size (ES) (Cohen’sd); ranged from low to high. In the Qigong studies ES varied d = 0.31–0.81, Reminiscence d = 0.20–2.37, and for single studies of Tai Chi d = 1.7 and for Life Story d = 1.46. From the meta-analyses, Qigong was the only treatment that had a significant effect on the severity of depression (Z = −4.47, p < 0.01) with acceptable statistical heterogeneity between studies (I2 = 52 %). Conclusion: Overall, there was a large methodological heterogeneity between studies attributed to differing treatments, duration and designs. Reminiscence and Life Story showed an overall effect from a range of measures, as did the exercise therapies Qigong and Tai Chi. Qigong was the only therapy having a significant effect on depression. This therapy may be useful to alleviate depression due to the group and social interaction.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289483
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.25
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.985
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorGill, BK-
dc.contributor.authorCant, R-
dc.contributor.authorLam, L-
dc.contributor.authorCooper, S-
dc.contributor.authorLou, VWQ-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:13:19Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:13:19Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 2020, v. 88, p. article no. 104037-
dc.identifier.issn0167-4943-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289483-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To conduct a systematic review of randomized controlled trials to evaluate the evidence for the use of non-pharmacological depression therapies in older Chinese adults. Materials and methods: The population was individuals of Chinese extraction over the age of 60 who meet the criteria for depression. The review was conducted according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis (PRISMA). Six healthcare databases were systematically searched for publications to the end date July 2018. Included study variables were extracted and methodological quality assessments were performed. Ten studies reported sufficient data for meta-analysis. Results: Fifteen experimental and quasi-experimental studies fulfilled the selection criteria (N = 904 participants). Twelve studies provided sufficient data to evaluate the therapies using Effect Size (ES) (Cohen’sd); ranged from low to high. In the Qigong studies ES varied d = 0.31–0.81, Reminiscence d = 0.20–2.37, and for single studies of Tai Chi d = 1.7 and for Life Story d = 1.46. From the meta-analyses, Qigong was the only treatment that had a significant effect on the severity of depression (Z = −4.47, p < 0.01) with acceptable statistical heterogeneity between studies (I2 = 52 %). Conclusion: Overall, there was a large methodological heterogeneity between studies attributed to differing treatments, duration and designs. Reminiscence and Life Story showed an overall effect from a range of measures, as did the exercise therapies Qigong and Tai Chi. Qigong was the only therapy having a significant effect on depression. This therapy may be useful to alleviate depression due to the group and social interaction.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherElsevier Ireland Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.elsevier.com/locate/archger-
dc.relation.ispartofArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics-
dc.subjectChinese older adult-
dc.subjectDepression-
dc.subjectHealth outcome-
dc.subjectNon-pharmacological therapy-
dc.subjectSystematic review-
dc.titleNon-pharmacological depression therapies for older Chinese adults: A systematic review & meta-analysis-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLou, VWQ: wlou@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLou, VWQ=rp00607-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.archger.2020.104037-
dc.identifier.pmid32135393-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85080024070-
dc.identifier.hkuros316051-
dc.identifier.volume88-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 104037-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 104037-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000534540100009-
dc.publisher.placeIreland-
dc.identifier.issnl0167-4943-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats