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Article: Guns and Butter in China: How Chinese Citizens Respond to Military Spending

TitleGuns and Butter in China: How Chinese Citizens Respond to Military Spending
Authors
Issue Date2020
PublisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=CQY
Citation
The China Quarterly, 2020, p. 1-14 How to Cite?
AbstractMilitaries are sustained by public money that is diverted away from other domestic ends. How the public react to the “guns-versus-butter” trade-off is thus an important question in understanding the microfoundations of Chinese military power. However, there are few studies on public attitudes towards military spending in China, whose rising power has been a grave concern to many policymakers around the world. We fielded a national online survey to investigate the nature of public support for military spending in China. We find that Chinese citizens support military spending in the abstract, but their support diminishes when considered alongside other domestic spending priorities. We also find that public support for military spending coexists surprisingly with anti-war sentiments and a significant strain of isolationism. In addition, while the conventional wisdom suggests that nationalism moves a state towards bellicosity and war, we find that Chinese citizens with a stronger sense of national pride report stronger anti-war sentiments than other citizens.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289472

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorHan, X-
dc.contributor.authorSadler, M-
dc.contributor.authorQuek, CK-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:13:10Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:13:10Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationThe China Quarterly, 2020, p. 1-14-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289472-
dc.description.abstractMilitaries are sustained by public money that is diverted away from other domestic ends. How the public react to the “guns-versus-butter” trade-off is thus an important question in understanding the microfoundations of Chinese military power. However, there are few studies on public attitudes towards military spending in China, whose rising power has been a grave concern to many policymakers around the world. We fielded a national online survey to investigate the nature of public support for military spending in China. We find that Chinese citizens support military spending in the abstract, but their support diminishes when considered alongside other domestic spending priorities. We also find that public support for military spending coexists surprisingly with anti-war sentiments and a significant strain of isolationism. In addition, while the conventional wisdom suggests that nationalism moves a state towards bellicosity and war, we find that Chinese citizens with a stronger sense of national pride report stronger anti-war sentiments than other citizens.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherCambridge University Press. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.cambridge.org/action/displayJournal?jid=CQY-
dc.relation.ispartofThe China Quarterly-
dc.rightsThe China Quarterly. Copyright © Cambridge University Press.-
dc.rightsThis article has been published in a revised form in [Journal] [http://doi.org/XXX]. This version is free to view and download for private research and study only. Not for re-distribution, re-sale or use in derivative works. © copyright holder.-
dc.titleGuns and Butter in China: How Chinese Citizens Respond to Military Spending-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailQuek, CK: quek@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityQuek, CK=rp01797-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0305741020000260-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85082530036-
dc.identifier.hkuros316412-
dc.identifier.spage1-
dc.identifier.epage14-

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