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Article: How can the urban landscape affect urban vitality at the street block level? A case study of 15 metropolises in China

TitleHow can the urban landscape affect urban vitality at the street block level? A case study of 15 metropolises in China
Authors
KeywordsUrban vitality
urban landscape
street blocks
diurnal discrepancy
China
Issue Date2020
PublisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.sagepub.com/home/epb
Citation
Environment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science, 2020, Epub 2020-05-18 How to Cite?
AbstractUrban vitality, as a metric, measures the attractiveness and competitiveness of a city and is a driver of development. As the physical and social space of human activities, the urban landscape has close connections with urban vitality according to classical theories. However, limited quantitative criteria for the urban landscape and gaps between macro urban planning and micro design create difficulties when constructing a vibrant city. In this study, we quantitatively examined the relationship between the urban landscape and urban vitality at the street block level using geospatial open data to discover where, how, and to what extent we could improve urban vitality, taking 15 Chinese metropolises as a case study. Results indicate that, among the three aspects of the urban landscape considered, the city plan pattern has the highest effect on stimulating vitality, followed by the land use and the patterns of building form. Specifically, the three-dimensional form of buildings has a greater effect than a two-dimensional form. In addition, convenient transportation, a compact block form, diverse buildings, mixed land use, and high buildings are the main characteristics of vibrant blocks. The results also show that the effects of the urban landscape have spatial variations and obvious diurnal discrepancies. Furthermore, over 20 and 33% of the blocks in these cities are identified as low-vitality blocks during the day and night, respectively, and are then categorized into six different types. The identification of the common characteristics of these low-vitality blocks can be taken as references for designing a vibrant urbanity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289085
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 3.619
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.889
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorZHANG, A-
dc.contributor.authorLi, W-
dc.contributor.authorWu, J-
dc.contributor.authorLin, J-
dc.contributor.authorChu, J-
dc.contributor.authorXIA, C-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-22T08:07:38Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-22T08:07:38Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationEnvironment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science, 2020, Epub 2020-05-18-
dc.identifier.issn2399-8083-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/289085-
dc.description.abstractUrban vitality, as a metric, measures the attractiveness and competitiveness of a city and is a driver of development. As the physical and social space of human activities, the urban landscape has close connections with urban vitality according to classical theories. However, limited quantitative criteria for the urban landscape and gaps between macro urban planning and micro design create difficulties when constructing a vibrant city. In this study, we quantitatively examined the relationship between the urban landscape and urban vitality at the street block level using geospatial open data to discover where, how, and to what extent we could improve urban vitality, taking 15 Chinese metropolises as a case study. Results indicate that, among the three aspects of the urban landscape considered, the city plan pattern has the highest effect on stimulating vitality, followed by the land use and the patterns of building form. Specifically, the three-dimensional form of buildings has a greater effect than a two-dimensional form. In addition, convenient transportation, a compact block form, diverse buildings, mixed land use, and high buildings are the main characteristics of vibrant blocks. The results also show that the effects of the urban landscape have spatial variations and obvious diurnal discrepancies. Furthermore, over 20 and 33% of the blocks in these cities are identified as low-vitality blocks during the day and night, respectively, and are then categorized into six different types. The identification of the common characteristics of these low-vitality blocks can be taken as references for designing a vibrant urbanity.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.sagepub.com/home/epb-
dc.relation.ispartofEnvironment and Planning B: Urban Analytics and City Science-
dc.rightsAuthor(s), Contribution Title, Journal Title (Journal Volume Number and Issue Number) pp. xx-xx. Copyright © [year] (Copyright Holder). DOI: [DOI number].-
dc.subjectUrban vitality-
dc.subjecturban landscape-
dc.subjectstreet blocks-
dc.subjectdiurnal discrepancy-
dc.subjectChina-
dc.titleHow can the urban landscape affect urban vitality at the street block level? A case study of 15 metropolises in China-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLi, W: wfli@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLi, W=rp01507-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/2399808320924425-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85085502614-
dc.identifier.hkuros315901-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-05-18-
dc.identifier.spage239980832092442-
dc.identifier.epage239980832092442-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000534499800001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl2399-8083-

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