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Article: Species-specific molecular responses of wild coral reef fishes during a marine heatwave

TitleSpecies-specific molecular responses of wild coral reef fishes during a marine heatwave
Authors
KeywordsElevated temperature
Fish communities
Fish populations
Functional response
Great Barrier Reef
Issue Date2020
PublisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science: Science Advances. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scienceadvances.org/
Citation
Science Advances, 2020, v. 6 n. 12, p. article no. eaay3423 How to Cite?
AbstractThe marine heatwave of 2016 was one of longest and hottest thermal anomalies recorded on the Great Barrier Reef, influencing multiple species of marine ectotherms, including coral reef fishes. There is a gap in our understanding of what the physiological consequences of heatwaves in wild fish populations are. Thus, in this study, we used liver transcriptomes to understand the molecular response of five species to the 2016 heatwave conditions. Gene expression was species specific, yet we detected overlap in functional responses associated with thermal stress previously reported in experimental setups. The molecular response was also influenced by the duration of exposure to elevated temperatures. This study highlights the importance of considering the effects of extreme warming events when evaluating the consequences of climate change on fish communities.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287830
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 13.116
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorBernal, MA-
dc.contributor.authorSchunter, C-
dc.contributor.authorLehmann, R-
dc.contributor.authorLightfoot, DJ-
dc.contributor.authorAllan, BJM-
dc.contributor.authorVeilleux, HD-
dc.contributor.authorRummer, JL-
dc.contributor.authorMunday, PL-
dc.contributor.authorRavasi, T-
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-05T12:03:55Z-
dc.date.available2020-10-05T12:03:55Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationScience Advances, 2020, v. 6 n. 12, p. article no. eaay3423-
dc.identifier.issn2375-2548-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/287830-
dc.description.abstractThe marine heatwave of 2016 was one of longest and hottest thermal anomalies recorded on the Great Barrier Reef, influencing multiple species of marine ectotherms, including coral reef fishes. There is a gap in our understanding of what the physiological consequences of heatwaves in wild fish populations are. Thus, in this study, we used liver transcriptomes to understand the molecular response of five species to the 2016 heatwave conditions. Gene expression was species specific, yet we detected overlap in functional responses associated with thermal stress previously reported in experimental setups. The molecular response was also influenced by the duration of exposure to elevated temperatures. This study highlights the importance of considering the effects of extreme warming events when evaluating the consequences of climate change on fish communities.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherAmerican Association for the Advancement of Science: Science Advances. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.scienceadvances.org/-
dc.relation.ispartofScience Advances-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectElevated temperature-
dc.subjectFish communities-
dc.subjectFish populations-
dc.subjectFunctional response-
dc.subjectGreat Barrier Reef-
dc.titleSpecies-specific molecular responses of wild coral reef fishes during a marine heatwave-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSchunter, C: schunter@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authoritySchunter, C=rp02465-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1126/sciadv.aay3423-
dc.identifier.pmid32206711-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC7080449-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85082169719-
dc.identifier.hkuros314792-
dc.identifier.volume6-
dc.identifier.issue12-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. eaay3423-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. eaay3423-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000521937000013-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl2375-2548-

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