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Article: Spine Surgery and COVID-19: The Influence of Practice Type on Preparedness, Response, and Economic Impact

TitleSpine Surgery and COVID-19: The Influence of Practice Type on Preparedness, Response, and Economic Impact
Authors
KeywordsCOVID-19
coronavirus
spine
surgeons
private practice
Issue Date2020
PublisherSAGE Publications (UK and US): Open Access Titles. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.sagepub.com/loi/gsj
Citation
Global Spine Journal, 2020, Epub 2020-08-07 How to Cite?
AbstractStudy Design: Cross-sectional observational cohort study. Objective: To investigate preparation, response, and economic impact of COVID-19 on private, public, academic, and privademic spine surgeons. Methods: AO Spine COVID-19 and Spine Surgeon Global Impact Survey includes domains on surgeon demographics, location of practice, type of practice, COVID-19 perceptions, institutional preparedness and response, personal and practice impact, and future perceptions. The survey was distributed by AO Spine via email to members (n = 3805). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify differences between practice settings. Results: A total of 902 surgeons completed the survey. In all, 45.4% of respondents worked in an academic setting, 22.9% in privademics, 16.1% in private practice, and 15.6% in public hospitals. Academic practice setting was independently associated with performing elective and emergent spine surgeries at the time of survey distribution. A majority of surgeons reported a >75% decrease in case volume. Private practice and privademic surgeons reported losing income at a higher rate compared with academic or public surgeons. Practice setting was associated with personal protective equipment availability and economic issues as a source of stress. Conclusions: The current study indicates that practice setting affected both preparedness and response to COVID-19. Surgeons in private and privademic practices reported increased worry about the economic implications of the current crisis compared with surgeons in academic and public hospitals. COVID-19 decreased overall clinical productivity, revenue, and income. Government response to the current pandemic and preparation for future pandemics needs to be adaptable to surgeons in all practice settings.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285309
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 2.915
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.108
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorWeiner, JA-
dc.contributor.authorSwiatek, PR-
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, DJ-
dc.contributor.authorLouie, PK-
dc.contributor.authorHarada, GK-
dc.contributor.authorMcCarthy, MH-
dc.contributor.authorGermscheid, N-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, JPY-
dc.contributor.authorNeva, MH-
dc.contributor.authorEl-Sharkawi, M-
dc.contributor.authorValacco, M-
dc.contributor.authorSciubba, DM-
dc.contributor.authorChutkan, NB-
dc.contributor.authorAn, HS-
dc.contributor.authorSamartzis, D-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-18T03:52:17Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-18T03:52:17Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationGlobal Spine Journal, 2020, Epub 2020-08-07-
dc.identifier.issn2192-5682-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285309-
dc.description.abstractStudy Design: Cross-sectional observational cohort study. Objective: To investigate preparation, response, and economic impact of COVID-19 on private, public, academic, and privademic spine surgeons. Methods: AO Spine COVID-19 and Spine Surgeon Global Impact Survey includes domains on surgeon demographics, location of practice, type of practice, COVID-19 perceptions, institutional preparedness and response, personal and practice impact, and future perceptions. The survey was distributed by AO Spine via email to members (n = 3805). Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify differences between practice settings. Results: A total of 902 surgeons completed the survey. In all, 45.4% of respondents worked in an academic setting, 22.9% in privademics, 16.1% in private practice, and 15.6% in public hospitals. Academic practice setting was independently associated with performing elective and emergent spine surgeries at the time of survey distribution. A majority of surgeons reported a >75% decrease in case volume. Private practice and privademic surgeons reported losing income at a higher rate compared with academic or public surgeons. Practice setting was associated with personal protective equipment availability and economic issues as a source of stress. Conclusions: The current study indicates that practice setting affected both preparedness and response to COVID-19. Surgeons in private and privademic practices reported increased worry about the economic implications of the current crisis compared with surgeons in academic and public hospitals. COVID-19 decreased overall clinical productivity, revenue, and income. Government response to the current pandemic and preparation for future pandemics needs to be adaptable to surgeons in all practice settings.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSAGE Publications (UK and US): Open Access Titles. The Journal's web site is located at http://journals.sagepub.com/loi/gsj-
dc.relation.ispartofGlobal Spine Journal-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectCOVID-19-
dc.subjectcoronavirus-
dc.subjectspine-
dc.subjectsurgeons-
dc.subjectprivate practice-
dc.titleSpine Surgery and COVID-19: The Influence of Practice Type on Preparedness, Response, and Economic Impact-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, JPY: cheungjp@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, JPY=rp01685-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/2192568220949183-
dc.identifier.pmid32762354-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85089095188-
dc.identifier.hkuros312737-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-08-07-
dc.identifier.spage219256822094918-
dc.identifier.epage219256822094918-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000558363000001-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-
dc.identifier.issnl2192-5682-

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