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Article: High neutralizing antibody titer in intensive care unit patients with COVID-19

TitleHigh neutralizing antibody titer in intensive care unit patients with COVID-19
Authors
KeywordsCOVID19
SARS-CoV-2
neutralizing antibody
disease severity
ICU patient
Issue Date2020
PublisherTaylor & Francis Group, on behalf of Shanghai ShangyixunCultural Communication Co., Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/temi20/current
Citation
Emerging Microbes & Infections, 2020, v. 9 n. 1, p. 1664-1670 How to Cite?
AbstractCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has a wide spectrum of disease severity from mild upper respiratory symptoms to respiratory failure. The role of neutralizing antibody (NAb) response in disease progression remains elusive. This study determined the seroprevalence of 733 non-COVID-19 individuals from April 2018 to February 2020 in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and compared the neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses of eight COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with those of 42 patients not admitted to the ICU. We found that NAb against SARS-CoV-2 was not detectable in any of the anonymous serum specimens from the 733 non-COVID-19 individuals. The peak serum geometric mean NAb titer was significantly higher among the eight ICU patients than the 42 non-ICU patients (7280 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1468-36099]) vs (671 [95% CI, 368-1223]). Furthermore, NAb titer increased significantly at earlier infection stages among ICU patients than among non-ICU patients. The median number of days to reach the peak Nab titers after symptoms onset was shorter among the ICU patients (17.6) than that of the non-ICU patients (20.1). Multivariate analysis showed that oxygen requirement and fever during admission were the only clinical factors independently associated with higher NAb titers. Our data suggested that SARS-CoV-2 was unlikely to have silently spread before the COVID-19 emergence in Hong Kong. ICU patients had an accelerated and augmented NAb response compared to non-ICU patients, which was associated with disease severity. Further studies are required to understand the relationship between high NAb response and disease severity.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285288
ISSN
2018 Impact Factor: 6.212
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.774

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLiu, L-
dc.contributor.authorTo, KKW-
dc.contributor.authorChan, KH-
dc.contributor.authorWong, YC-
dc.contributor.authorZhou, R-
dc.contributor.authorKwan, KY-
dc.contributor.authorFong, CHY-
dc.contributor.authorChen, LL-
dc.contributor.authorChoi, CYK-
dc.contributor.authorLu, L-
dc.contributor.authorTsang, OTY-
dc.contributor.authorLeung, WS-
dc.contributor.authorTo, WK-
dc.contributor.authorHung, IFN-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, KY-
dc.contributor.authorChen, Z-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-18T03:52:02Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-18T03:52:02Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationEmerging Microbes & Infections, 2020, v. 9 n. 1, p. 1664-1670-
dc.identifier.issn2222-1751-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285288-
dc.description.abstractCoronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has a wide spectrum of disease severity from mild upper respiratory symptoms to respiratory failure. The role of neutralizing antibody (NAb) response in disease progression remains elusive. This study determined the seroprevalence of 733 non-COVID-19 individuals from April 2018 to February 2020 in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region and compared the neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses of eight COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU) with those of 42 patients not admitted to the ICU. We found that NAb against SARS-CoV-2 was not detectable in any of the anonymous serum specimens from the 733 non-COVID-19 individuals. The peak serum geometric mean NAb titer was significantly higher among the eight ICU patients than the 42 non-ICU patients (7280 [95% confidence interval (CI) 1468-36099]) vs (671 [95% CI, 368-1223]). Furthermore, NAb titer increased significantly at earlier infection stages among ICU patients than among non-ICU patients. The median number of days to reach the peak Nab titers after symptoms onset was shorter among the ICU patients (17.6) than that of the non-ICU patients (20.1). Multivariate analysis showed that oxygen requirement and fever during admission were the only clinical factors independently associated with higher NAb titers. Our data suggested that SARS-CoV-2 was unlikely to have silently spread before the COVID-19 emergence in Hong Kong. ICU patients had an accelerated and augmented NAb response compared to non-ICU patients, which was associated with disease severity. Further studies are required to understand the relationship between high NAb response and disease severity.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherTaylor & Francis Group, on behalf of Shanghai ShangyixunCultural Communication Co., Ltd. The Journal's web site is located at https://www.tandfonline.com/toc/temi20/current-
dc.relation.ispartofEmerging Microbes & Infections-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectCOVID19-
dc.subjectSARS-CoV-2-
dc.subjectneutralizing antibody-
dc.subjectdisease severity-
dc.subjectICU patient-
dc.titleHigh neutralizing antibody titer in intensive care unit patients with COVID-19-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLiu, L: liuli71@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTo, KKW: kelvinto@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChan, KH: chankh2@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWong, YC: wongycm@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailZhou, R: zhourh@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailKwan, KY: hallieky@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFong, CHY: chyfong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChoi, CYK: yeekic@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailHung, IFN: ivanhung@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, KY: kyyuen@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChen, Z: zchenai@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLiu, L=rp00268-
dc.identifier.authorityTo, KKW=rp01384-
dc.identifier.authorityChan, KH=rp01921-
dc.identifier.authorityHung, IFN=rp00508-
dc.identifier.authorityYuen, KY=rp00366-
dc.identifier.authorityChen, Z=rp00243-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/22221751.2020.1791738-
dc.identifier.pmid32618497-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85088113536-
dc.identifier.hkuros312816-
dc.identifier.volume9-
dc.identifier.issue1-
dc.identifier.spage1664-
dc.identifier.epage1670-
dc.publisher.placeUnited Kingdom-

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