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Article: Intratracheal Administration of Dry Powder Formulation in Mice

TitleIntratracheal Administration of Dry Powder Formulation in Mice
Authors
KeywordsDry Powder Inhalers
Spray Drying
Inhalation
Issue Date2020
PublisherJournal of Visualized Experiments. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jove.com
Citation
Journal of Visualized Experiments, 2020, v. 161, p. article no. e61469 How to Cite?
AbstractIn the development of inhalable dry powder formulations, it is essential to evaluate their biological activities in preclinical animal models. This paper introduces a noninvasive method of intratracheal delivery of dry powder formulation in mice. A dry powder loading device that consists of a 200 µL gel loading pipette tip connected to an 1 mL syringe via a three-way stopcock is presented. A small amount of dry powder (1-2 mg) is loaded into the pipette tip and dispersed by 0.6 mL of air in the syringe. Because pipette tips are disposable and inexpensive, different dry powder formulations can be loaded into different tips in advance. Various formulations can be evaluated in the same animal experiment without device cleaning and dose refilling, thereby saving time and eliminating the risk of cross-contamination from residual powder. The extent of powder dispersion can be inspected by the amount of powder remaining in the pipette tip. A protocol of intubation in mouse with a custom-made light source and a guiding cannula is included. Proper intubation is one of the key factors that influences the intratracheal delivery of dry powder formulation to the deep lung region of the mouse.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285119
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 1.163
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.451

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorQIU, Y-
dc.contributor.authorLIAO, Q-
dc.contributor.authorCHOW, MYT-
dc.contributor.authorLam, JKW-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T09:07:00Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-07T09:07:00Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Visualized Experiments, 2020, v. 161, p. article no. e61469-
dc.identifier.issn1940-087X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/285119-
dc.description.abstractIn the development of inhalable dry powder formulations, it is essential to evaluate their biological activities in preclinical animal models. This paper introduces a noninvasive method of intratracheal delivery of dry powder formulation in mice. A dry powder loading device that consists of a 200 µL gel loading pipette tip connected to an 1 mL syringe via a three-way stopcock is presented. A small amount of dry powder (1-2 mg) is loaded into the pipette tip and dispersed by 0.6 mL of air in the syringe. Because pipette tips are disposable and inexpensive, different dry powder formulations can be loaded into different tips in advance. Various formulations can be evaluated in the same animal experiment without device cleaning and dose refilling, thereby saving time and eliminating the risk of cross-contamination from residual powder. The extent of powder dispersion can be inspected by the amount of powder remaining in the pipette tip. A protocol of intubation in mouse with a custom-made light source and a guiding cannula is included. Proper intubation is one of the key factors that influences the intratracheal delivery of dry powder formulation to the deep lung region of the mouse.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJournal of Visualized Experiments. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.jove.com-
dc.relation.ispartofJournal of Visualized Experiments-
dc.rightsJournal of Visualized Experiments. Copyright © Journal of Visualized Experiments.-
dc.subjectDry Powder Inhalers-
dc.subjectSpray Drying-
dc.subjectInhalation-
dc.titleIntratracheal Administration of Dry Powder Formulation in Mice-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLam, JKW: jkwlam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, JKW=rp01346-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.3791/61469-
dc.identifier.pmid32773763-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85088952081-
dc.identifier.hkuros312464-
dc.identifier.volume161-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. e61469-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. e61469-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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