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Article: Conservation Genetic Assessment of Savannah Elephants (Loxodonta africana) in the Greater Kruger Biosphere, South Africa

TitleConservation Genetic Assessment of Savannah Elephants (Loxodonta africana) in the Greater Kruger Biosphere, South Africa
Authors
KeywordsLoxodonta africana
Greater Kruger National Park (GKNP)
conservation genetics
genetic structure
effective population size
Issue Date2019
PublisherMDPI AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/genes
Citation
Genes, 2019, v. 10 n. 10, p. article no. 779 How to Cite?
AbstractSavannah elephant populations have been severely reduced and fragmented throughout its remaining range. In general, however, there is limited information regarding their genetic status, which is essential knowledge for conservation. We investigated patterns of genetic variation in savannah elephants from the Greater Kruger Biosphere, with a focus on those in previously unstudied nature reserves adjacent to Kruger National Park, using dung samples from 294 individuals and 18 microsatellites. The results of genetic structure analyses using several different methods of ordination and Bayesian clustering strongly suggest that elephants throughout the Greater Kruger National Park (GKNP) constitute a single population. No evidence of a recent genetic bottleneck was detected using three moment-based approaches and two coalescent likelihood methods. The apparent absence of a recent genetic bottleneck associated with the known early 1900s demographic bottleneck may result from a combination of rapid post-bottleneck population growth, immigration and long generation time. Point estimates of contemporary effective population size (Ne) for the GKNP were ~ 500–700, that is, at the low end of the range of Ne values that have been proposed for maintaining evolutionary potential and the current ratio of Ne to census population size (Nc) may be quite low (<0.1). This study illustrates the difficulties in assessing the impacts on Ne in populations that have suffered demographic crashes but have recovered rapidly and received gene flow, particularly in species with long generation times in which genetic time lags are longer. This work provides a starting point and baseline information for genetic monitoring of the GKNP elephants.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284712
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 4.096
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 1.337
PubMed Central ID
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSantos, TL-
dc.contributor.authorFernandes, C-
dc.contributor.authorHenley, MD-
dc.contributor.authorDawson, DA-
dc.contributor.authorMumby, HS-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T09:01:39Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-07T09:01:39Z-
dc.date.issued2019-
dc.identifier.citationGenes, 2019, v. 10 n. 10, p. article no. 779-
dc.identifier.issn2073-4425-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284712-
dc.description.abstractSavannah elephant populations have been severely reduced and fragmented throughout its remaining range. In general, however, there is limited information regarding their genetic status, which is essential knowledge for conservation. We investigated patterns of genetic variation in savannah elephants from the Greater Kruger Biosphere, with a focus on those in previously unstudied nature reserves adjacent to Kruger National Park, using dung samples from 294 individuals and 18 microsatellites. The results of genetic structure analyses using several different methods of ordination and Bayesian clustering strongly suggest that elephants throughout the Greater Kruger National Park (GKNP) constitute a single population. No evidence of a recent genetic bottleneck was detected using three moment-based approaches and two coalescent likelihood methods. The apparent absence of a recent genetic bottleneck associated with the known early 1900s demographic bottleneck may result from a combination of rapid post-bottleneck population growth, immigration and long generation time. Point estimates of contemporary effective population size (Ne) for the GKNP were ~ 500–700, that is, at the low end of the range of Ne values that have been proposed for maintaining evolutionary potential and the current ratio of Ne to census population size (Nc) may be quite low (<0.1). This study illustrates the difficulties in assessing the impacts on Ne in populations that have suffered demographic crashes but have recovered rapidly and received gene flow, particularly in species with long generation times in which genetic time lags are longer. This work provides a starting point and baseline information for genetic monitoring of the GKNP elephants.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherMDPI AG. The Journal's web site is located at http://www.mdpi.com/journal/genes-
dc.relation.ispartofGenes-
dc.rightsThis work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.-
dc.subjectLoxodonta africana-
dc.subjectGreater Kruger National Park (GKNP)-
dc.subjectconservation genetics-
dc.subjectgenetic structure-
dc.subjecteffective population size-
dc.titleConservation Genetic Assessment of Savannah Elephants (Loxodonta africana) in the Greater Kruger Biosphere, South Africa-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailMumby, HS: hsmumby@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityMumby, HS=rp02538-
dc.description.naturepublished_or_final_version-
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/genes10100779-
dc.identifier.pmid31590388-
dc.identifier.pmcidPMC6826889-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85072963817-
dc.identifier.hkuros312450-
dc.identifier.volume10-
dc.identifier.issue10-
dc.identifier.spagearticle no. 779-
dc.identifier.epagearticle no. 779-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000498397100050-
dc.publisher.placeSwitzerland-
dc.identifier.issnl2073-4425-

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