File Download
  Links for fulltext
     (May Require Subscription)
Supplementary

Article: Higher Circulating Adiponectin Concentrations Predict Incident Cancer in Type 2 Diabetes – The Adiponectin Paradox

TitleHigher Circulating Adiponectin Concentrations Predict Incident Cancer in Type 2 Diabetes – The Adiponectin Paradox
Authors
Keywordsadiponectin
type 2 diabetes mellitus
prediction model
cancer
Issue Date2020
PublisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at https://academic.oup.com/jcem
Citation
The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2020, v. 105 n. 4, p. e1387-e1396 How to Cite?
AbstractIntroduction: Despite the beneficial cardiometabolic effects of adiponectin demonstrated in preclinical studies, paradoxically higher circulating adiponectin concentrations have been found in epidemiological studies to be associated with incident cardiovascular events, renal outcomes, and mortality in patients with diabetes. On the other hand, diabetes is also associated with an increased risk of cancer. Here, we investigated prospectively the association between circulating adiponectin concentrations and incident cancer using a cohort of exclusively individuals with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: Baseline serum adiponectin concentrations were measured in 5658 participants recruited from the Hong Kong West Diabetes Registry. The associations of circulating adiponectin concentrations with incident cancer and cancer-related deaths were evaluated using multivariable Cox regression analysis, with hazard ratio (HR) for adiponectin referring to the respective risk per doubling of serum adiponectin concentration. Results:Over a median-follow up of 6.5 years, 7.53% and 3% of participants developed cancer and had cancer-related deaths, respectively. Serum adiponectin concentrations were significantly higher in those who had incident cancer (9.8 μg/mL vs 9.1 μg/mL, P < 0.001) and cancer-related deaths (11.5 μg/mL vs 9.3 μg/mL, P < 0.001) compared with those without. Moreover, in multivariable analyses, serum adiponectin concentration was independently associated with both incident cancer (hazard ratio, 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.05–1.35; P = 0.006) and cancer-related deaths (hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.03–1.47; P = 0.024). Conclusions: Higher serum adiponectin concentration was independently associated with incident cancer and cancer-related deaths in type 2 diabetes, indicating that adiponectin paradox can be observed in another major diabetic complication in addition to cardiovascular and kidney diseases.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284581
ISSN
2020 Impact Factor: 5.958
2020 SCImago Journal Rankings: 2.206
ISI Accession Number ID

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, CH-
dc.contributor.authorLui, DTW-
dc.contributor.authorCheung, CYY-
dc.contributor.authorFong, CHY-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, MMA-
dc.contributor.authorChow, WS-
dc.contributor.authorWoo, YC-
dc.contributor.authorXu, A-
dc.contributor.authorLam, KSL-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T08:59:40Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-07T08:59:40Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationThe Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2020, v. 105 n. 4, p. e1387-e1396-
dc.identifier.issn0021-972X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284581-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Despite the beneficial cardiometabolic effects of adiponectin demonstrated in preclinical studies, paradoxically higher circulating adiponectin concentrations have been found in epidemiological studies to be associated with incident cardiovascular events, renal outcomes, and mortality in patients with diabetes. On the other hand, diabetes is also associated with an increased risk of cancer. Here, we investigated prospectively the association between circulating adiponectin concentrations and incident cancer using a cohort of exclusively individuals with type 2 diabetes. Materials and Methods: Baseline serum adiponectin concentrations were measured in 5658 participants recruited from the Hong Kong West Diabetes Registry. The associations of circulating adiponectin concentrations with incident cancer and cancer-related deaths were evaluated using multivariable Cox regression analysis, with hazard ratio (HR) for adiponectin referring to the respective risk per doubling of serum adiponectin concentration. Results:Over a median-follow up of 6.5 years, 7.53% and 3% of participants developed cancer and had cancer-related deaths, respectively. Serum adiponectin concentrations were significantly higher in those who had incident cancer (9.8 μg/mL vs 9.1 μg/mL, P < 0.001) and cancer-related deaths (11.5 μg/mL vs 9.3 μg/mL, P < 0.001) compared with those without. Moreover, in multivariable analyses, serum adiponectin concentration was independently associated with both incident cancer (hazard ratio, 1.19; 95% confidence interval, 1.05–1.35; P = 0.006) and cancer-related deaths (hazard ratio, 1.23; 95% confidence interval, 1.03–1.47; P = 0.024). Conclusions: Higher serum adiponectin concentration was independently associated with incident cancer and cancer-related deaths in type 2 diabetes, indicating that adiponectin paradox can be observed in another major diabetic complication in addition to cardiovascular and kidney diseases.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherOxford University Press. The Journal's web site is located at https://academic.oup.com/jcem-
dc.relation.ispartofThe Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism-
dc.rightsThis is a pre-copy-editing, author-produced PDF of an article accepted for publication in The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism following peer review. The definitive publisher-authenticated version The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2020, v. 105 n. 4, p. e1387-e1396 is available online at: https://academic.oup.com/jcem/article-abstract/105/4/e1387/5740218?redirectedFrom=fulltext-
dc.subjectadiponectin-
dc.subjecttype 2 diabetes mellitus-
dc.subjectprediction model-
dc.subjectcancer-
dc.titleHigher Circulating Adiponectin Concentrations Predict Incident Cancer in Type 2 Diabetes – The Adiponectin Paradox-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, CH: pchlee@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailCheung, CYY: cyy0219@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailFong, CHY: kalofong@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYuen, MMA: mmayuen@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailChow, WS: chowws01@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailWoo, YC: wooyucho@HKUCC-COM.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailXu, A: amxu@hkucc.hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailLam, KSL: ksllam@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, CH=rp02043-
dc.identifier.authorityCheung, CYY=rp02243-
dc.identifier.authorityXu, A=rp00485-
dc.identifier.authorityLam, KSL=rp00343-
dc.description.naturepostprint-
dc.identifier.doi10.1210/clinem/dgaa075-
dc.identifier.pmid32072163-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85081945458-
dc.identifier.hkuros312504-
dc.identifier.hkuros323139-
dc.identifier.volume105-
dc.identifier.issue4-
dc.identifier.spagee1387-
dc.identifier.epagee1396-
dc.identifier.isiWOS:000525950100032-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-
dc.identifier.issnl0021-972X-

Export via OAI-PMH Interface in XML Formats


OR


Export to Other Non-XML Formats