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Article: Conjunctival Adenosquamous Carcinoma Lacks MAML2 Translocation: A Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Mucoepidermoid Differentiation and Aggressive Behavior?

TitleConjunctival Adenosquamous Carcinoma Lacks MAML2 Translocation: A Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Mucoepidermoid Differentiation and Aggressive Behavior?
Authors
Keywordsconjunctival mucoepidermoid carcinoma
conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma
MAML2 translocation
conjunctival adenosquamous carcinoma
Issue Date2020
PublisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://ijs.sagepub.com
Citation
International Journal of Surgical Pathology, 2020, Epub 2020-05-31 How to Cite?
AbstractConjunctival adenosquamous carcinoma, also known as mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), is a rare tumor that preferentially affects the perilimbal area of the conjunctiva with aggressive local invasion. Consisting of infiltrative proliferation of squamous cells and mucous cells, its morphologic features are reminiscent of the salivary gland-type MEC except for the absence of intermediate cells and frequent keratin production. We reported 2 cases of conjunctival adenosquamous carcinoma and, for the first time, studied the MAML2 translocation status of this rare entity. The 2 patients were women, aged 45 and 42 years, presenting with an erythematous lesion in the left lower palpebral conjunctiva and a pigmented nodule over the left nasal conjunctiva, respectively. One tumor recurred 6 months after the initial biopsy. Excision with lid reconstruction and postoperative radiotherapy was performed for margin involvement and perineural invasion. This patient was disease free at 3-year follow-up. The other patient was lost to follow-up after tumor excision. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction failed to demonstrate MAML2 translocation and CRCT1-MAML2 transcripts in both tumors. The absence of this characteristic translocation and reappraisal of the cellular composition, morphologic features, and precursor lesion suggest that conjunctival MEC may represent a variant of conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma but not related to the salivary gland-type MEC.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284511
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 0.872
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.409

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorLee, A-
dc.contributor.authorYuen, HKL-
dc.contributor.authorTham, CCY-
dc.contributor.authorCheuk, W-
dc.date.accessioned2020-08-07T08:58:41Z-
dc.date.available2020-08-07T08:58:41Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Surgical Pathology, 2020, Epub 2020-05-31-
dc.identifier.issn1066-8969-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284511-
dc.description.abstractConjunctival adenosquamous carcinoma, also known as mucoepidermoid carcinoma (MEC), is a rare tumor that preferentially affects the perilimbal area of the conjunctiva with aggressive local invasion. Consisting of infiltrative proliferation of squamous cells and mucous cells, its morphologic features are reminiscent of the salivary gland-type MEC except for the absence of intermediate cells and frequent keratin production. We reported 2 cases of conjunctival adenosquamous carcinoma and, for the first time, studied the MAML2 translocation status of this rare entity. The 2 patients were women, aged 45 and 42 years, presenting with an erythematous lesion in the left lower palpebral conjunctiva and a pigmented nodule over the left nasal conjunctiva, respectively. One tumor recurred 6 months after the initial biopsy. Excision with lid reconstruction and postoperative radiotherapy was performed for margin involvement and perineural invasion. This patient was disease free at 3-year follow-up. The other patient was lost to follow-up after tumor excision. Fluorescence in situ hybridization and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction failed to demonstrate MAML2 translocation and CRCT1-MAML2 transcripts in both tumors. The absence of this characteristic translocation and reappraisal of the cellular composition, morphologic features, and precursor lesion suggest that conjunctival MEC may represent a variant of conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma but not related to the salivary gland-type MEC.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherSage Publications, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://ijs.sagepub.com-
dc.relation.ispartofInternational Journal of Surgical Pathology-
dc.rightsInternational Journal of Surgical Pathology. Copyright © Sage Publications, Inc.-
dc.subjectconjunctival mucoepidermoid carcinoma-
dc.subjectconjunctival squamous cell carcinoma-
dc.subjectMAML2 translocation-
dc.subjectconjunctival adenosquamous carcinoma-
dc.titleConjunctival Adenosquamous Carcinoma Lacks MAML2 Translocation: A Variant of Squamous Cell Carcinoma With Mucoepidermoid Differentiation and Aggressive Behavior?-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailLee, A: aleeni@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityLee, A=rp02667-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1066896920918944-
dc.identifier.pmid32476556-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85085682755-
dc.identifier.hkuros312508-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-05-31-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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