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Article: Dry Skulls and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for Teaching Orofacial Bone Anatomy to Undergraduate Dental Students

TitleDry Skulls and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for Teaching Orofacial Bone Anatomy to Undergraduate Dental Students
Authors
Keywordsgross anatomy education
dental education
undergraduate education
dentistry
anatomy teaching
Issue Date2020
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1935-9780/issues/
Citation
Anatomical Sciences Education, 2020, Epub 2020-03-29 How to Cite?
AbstractLearning bone anatomy of the skull is a complex topic involving three‐dimensional information. The impact of the use of human dry skulls and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging was investigated in the teaching of undergraduate dental students. Sixty‐four first‐year students in the University of Hong Kong were randomly divided into eight groups. Four teaching methods were tested: (1) CBCT followed by standard lecture, (2) CBCT followed by lecture with skulls, (3) standard lecture followed by CBCT, and (4) lecture with skulls followed by CBCT. After each, students were given a multiple‐choice questionnaire to assess their objective learning outcome (20 questions) and a questionnaire for their subjective satisfaction (10 statements). Surveys were assessed with Cronbach's alpha, Kendall's tau‐b, and principal components analysis. Data were analyzed with Student's t‐test and a one‐way ANOVA (significance α = 0.05). Standard lecture followed by CBCT showed the highest learning outcome score (81.6% ± 14.1%), but no significant difference was present among four teaching methods. Cone beam computed tomography followed by lecture with skulls scored the highest overall subjective satisfaction (4.9 ± 0.8 out of 6), but no significant difference was present among teaching methods. Nevertheless, students' perception of learning was positively influenced by the use of skulls (P = 0.018). The timing of administration of the CBCT did not affect students' subjective satisfaction or objective learning outcome. Students perceived to learn more by using skulls, but their objective learning outcomes were not significantly affected. A discrepancy seems to exist between students' perception of learning and their effective performance.
Persistent Identifierhttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284006
ISSN
2019 Impact Factor: 3.759
2015 SCImago Journal Rankings: 0.633

 

DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorSavoldi, F-
dc.contributor.authorYeung, AWK-
dc.contributor.authorTanaka, R-
dc.contributor.authorZadeh, LSM-
dc.contributor.authorDa Palma Montalvao, C-
dc.contributor.authorBornstein, MM-
dc.contributor.authorTsoi, JKH-
dc.date.accessioned2020-07-20T05:55:16Z-
dc.date.available2020-07-20T05:55:16Z-
dc.date.issued2020-
dc.identifier.citationAnatomical Sciences Education, 2020, Epub 2020-03-29-
dc.identifier.issn1935-9772-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10722/284006-
dc.description.abstractLearning bone anatomy of the skull is a complex topic involving three‐dimensional information. The impact of the use of human dry skulls and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) imaging was investigated in the teaching of undergraduate dental students. Sixty‐four first‐year students in the University of Hong Kong were randomly divided into eight groups. Four teaching methods were tested: (1) CBCT followed by standard lecture, (2) CBCT followed by lecture with skulls, (3) standard lecture followed by CBCT, and (4) lecture with skulls followed by CBCT. After each, students were given a multiple‐choice questionnaire to assess their objective learning outcome (20 questions) and a questionnaire for their subjective satisfaction (10 statements). Surveys were assessed with Cronbach's alpha, Kendall's tau‐b, and principal components analysis. Data were analyzed with Student's t‐test and a one‐way ANOVA (significance α = 0.05). Standard lecture followed by CBCT showed the highest learning outcome score (81.6% ± 14.1%), but no significant difference was present among four teaching methods. Cone beam computed tomography followed by lecture with skulls scored the highest overall subjective satisfaction (4.9 ± 0.8 out of 6), but no significant difference was present among teaching methods. Nevertheless, students' perception of learning was positively influenced by the use of skulls (P = 0.018). The timing of administration of the CBCT did not affect students' subjective satisfaction or objective learning outcome. Students perceived to learn more by using skulls, but their objective learning outcomes were not significantly affected. A discrepancy seems to exist between students' perception of learning and their effective performance.-
dc.languageeng-
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Inc. The Journal's web site is located at http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1002/(ISSN)1935-9780/issues/-
dc.relation.ispartofAnatomical Sciences Education-
dc.rightsPreprint This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions. Postprint This is the peer reviewed version of the following article: [FULL CITE], which has been published in final form at [Link to final article using the DOI]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.-
dc.subjectgross anatomy education-
dc.subjectdental education-
dc.subjectundergraduate education-
dc.subjectdentistry-
dc.subjectanatomy teaching-
dc.titleDry Skulls and Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) for Teaching Orofacial Bone Anatomy to Undergraduate Dental Students-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.identifier.emailSavoldi, F: fsavoldi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailYeung, AWK: ndyeung@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTanaka, R: rayt3@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailBornstein, MM: bornst@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.emailTsoi, JKH: jkhtsoi@hku.hk-
dc.identifier.authorityYeung, AWK=rp02143-
dc.identifier.authorityTanaka, R=rp02130-
dc.identifier.authorityBornstein, MM=rp02217-
dc.identifier.authorityTsoi, JKH=rp01609-
dc.description.naturelink_to_subscribed_fulltext-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ase.1961-
dc.identifier.scopuseid_2-s2.0-85083637980-
dc.identifier.hkuros311175-
dc.identifier.volumeEpub 2020-03-29-
dc.publisher.placeUnited States-

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